P12452: Vibration Isolation and Novel Cooling System
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Project Summary Project Information

The scope of this project can be broken down into two distinct sub-projects, one focusing on the current vibrations present in the compressor system, and the other focusing on redesigning the cooling system into a thermosyphoning system instead of the current electric pump-driven system.

  • The current installation method for the compressor system was designed through project P11452. This system incorporated ten 1000lb. LORD dampers to minimize the vibrations that the floor would encounter due to the basement beneath the test cell. While the floor vibrations were minimized, the longitudinal motion is still very notable. The first task of this project is to minimize the unwanted longitudinal movement present when the system is running, with a goal of 50% motion reduction.
  • The second portion of this project is to take the current pump coolant system, also designed and implemented by P11452, and redesign the system to eliminate the need for the electric coolant pump. To accomplish this, a novel thermosyphoning coolant system is to be designed and implemented. The key benefit of this system is that it uses the thermodynamic properties of water to replace the need for the electric coolant pump, thus reducing the need for an electrical hook-up for the compressor system.
Dresser-Rand Reciprocating Compressor

Dresser-Rand Reciprocating Compressor

To meet these design challenges, two unique systems were created. To solve the vibration problem, a damper setup was designed and implemented to eliminate as much vibration as possible. An interesting and useful feature of the system is that, since the two technologies are so similar, magnetorheological dampers and standard car shocks can be interchanged into the system for varying degrees of damping. The thermosyphoning system was designed to minimize changeover time and processes between it and the pump-driven system. Through careful placement of valves and new coolant piping, a user can easily switch from the pump system to the closed-loop thermosyphoning system, which uses two sections of finned tubing to cool the compressor as it runs, using only the heat energy generated by the compressor for its input energy.

Proposed Mounting System

Proposed Mounting System

Proposed Thermosyphoning System

Proposed Thermosyphoning System

Project Name
Compressor Vibration Isolation and Cooling System
Project Number
P12452
Start Term
2011-2
End Term
2011-3
Faculty Guide
Bill Nowak
Primary Customer
Dr. Jason Kolodziej, jrkeme@rit.edu
Sponsor (financial support)
Dresser-Rand
Sponsor Contacts
James Sorokes, JSorokes@Dresser-Rand.com
Scott Delmotte, SDelmotte@Dresser-Rand.com
Project Sponsors

Project Sponsors

Special Thanks

Special Thanks

Team Members

Ryan, Matt, Chris, and John

Ryan, Matt, Chris, and John

Member Role Contact
John Burns Project Manager jrb8174@rit.edu
Ryan Hurley Principal Engineer rsh1636@rit.edu
Chris Guerra Thermo-Fluids Engineer cjg7410@rit.edu
Matt Kasemer Vibrations Engineer mpk1338@rit.edu

Table of Contents

MSD I MSD II

Project Readiness Package

Weekly Minutes

Team Values & Norms

Photo Gallery

Vibration Data

Planning & Execution

Systems Design

Detailed Design

Weekly Minutes

Photo Gallery

Build, Test, Document

Project Review

Final Presentation

Technical Paper

Poster

Lessons Learned

Acknowledgements

P12452 would like to thank the following groups and individuals for their assistance in various areas of the project: