P07021: Instrument to Detect Thromboemboli in Blood
/public/

P07021 PRP

Table of Contents

Administrative Information

Project Name
Design of an instrument to detect thromboemboli in blood.
Project Number
P07201
Project Family
Artificial Organ Engineering - Family of Projects
Track
Bioengineering and Assistive Device Technology
Start Term
2006-2
End Term
2006-3
Faculty Guide
Dr. Steven Day (ME)
Primary Customer
RIT Blood Pump Laboratory
Secondary Customers
Congestive Heart Failure Patients
Dr. Hensel (ME)
Customer contact information
Dr. Steven Day
Professor
swdeme@rit.edu

Project Overview

The heart is a mechanical organ that serves to pump blood through out the human body in order to deliver nutrients to your cells. The left ventricle within your heart is primarily responsible for completing this task. When the left ventricle is unable to produce the necessary pressure rise to circulate the blood it is said that a patient has Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). The RIT Blood Pump laboratory has developed a ventricular assist device to help CHF patients deliver necessary nutrients through out the body. When the pump components come in contact with the blood, fluid stresses arise and can damage the red blood cells. Additionally, thromboemboli in the blood can be generated within the pump, or enter the pump and be magnified in size and quantity. The main focus of this project is to develop a device to help detect and characterize these particles.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is thrombo-embolism? How does it differ from an embolism?

In medicine, an embolism occurs when an object (the embolus, plural emboli) migrates from one part of the body (through circulation) and cause(s) a blockage (occlusion) of a blood vessel in another part of the body.This can be contrasted with a "thrombus" which is the formation of a clot within a blood vessel, rather than being carried from elsewhere.

Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embolism

2. How is it formed?

Causes and symptoms

Arterial emboli are usually a complication of heart disease where blood clots form in the heart's chambers. Gas emboli are caused by rapid changes in environmental pressure that could happen when flying or scuba diving. A pulmonary embolism is caused by blood clots that travel through the blood stream to the lungs and block a pulmonary artery. More than 90% of the cases of pulmonary embolism are a complication of deep vein thrombosis, which typically occurs in patients who have had orthopedic surgery and patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses like congestive heart failure.

Source: http://www.answers.com/topic/embolism

3. Why is it important that we detect an embolism?

An embolism poses many health risks to a human; if we can diagnose and treat an embolism we can improve the quality of life for that individual.

4. What threats does it pose to a human subject?

Risk factors for arterial and pulmonary emboli include: prolonged bed rest, surgery, childbirth, heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, cancer, obesity, a broken hip or leg, oral contraceptives, sickle cell anemia, chest trauma, certain congenital heart defects, and old age. Risk factors for gas emboli include: scuba diving, amateur plane flight, exercise, injury, obesity, dehydration,

Common symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include:

Less common symptoms include:

Symptoms of an arterial embolism include:

Source: http://www.answers.com/topic/embolism

Staffing Requirements

Staffing
Team Member Discipline Role
Steven Day ME Faculty Guide swdeme@rit.edu
Evelyn Adames ME Project/Documentation Manager exa0751@rit.edu
Carlos Cheek ME Assistant Manager/Systems Engineer cdc6549@rit.edu
Thomas Fountain ME Fluids Dynamicist txf8539@rit.edu
Maria Noriega EE Sensors and Data Acquisition mgn5422@rit.edu
Robert Mahar EE Analog Signal Processing & Systems Integration ram3139@rit.edu
Trevor Hyde EE Digital Signal Processing tjh6910@rit.edu
Adam Wagner EE Analog Signal Processing ajw1524@rit.edu
Eric Shyu CE Computer Hardware & Software Engineer eys3349@rit.edu

Continuation, Platform, or Building Block Project Information

The long term goal of the project will be to develop a Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) to implant in to the human heart. The short term goal will be to determine if the current pump design creates or exacerbates any problems within the blood stream that come in contact with the pump.

The Assistive Devices and Bioengineering Track is focused on the application of technology to improve the quality of life for individuals with disabilities, and the development of technologies related to the broad field of bioengineering.

The mission of each student team contributing to this track is to develop or enhance a particular subsystem for an assistive device, and provide complete documentation of the analysis, design, manufacturing, fabrication, test, and evaluation of each subsystem to a level of detail.

Related Project Title Start Term End Term
P06216 Optical Stage Redesign 2004-2 2004-3
P07302 Motor Controller Subsystem 2006-1 2006-2

Principle Sponsor or Sponsoring Organization

Support for this project is generously provided by the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood.

Support for this project is generously provided by the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood.

This project is supported by a gift from the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood (NHLBI) to the mechanical engineering department at RIT.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) works with researchers nd universities to help advance technology in the following areas: the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, and blood diseases. For more information about NHLBI please visit http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/.

Detailed Project Description

Customer Needs

Overall Need: A working instrument for detecting micro-emboli in blood.

Hierarchical Customer Needs

Nomenclature

System:
refers to all components connected and grouped together as a whole.
Instrument:
a sub-system that is responsible for detecting the thromboemboli.
1. Why is the requirement for emboli detection 50e-6m?
The requirement was 50e-6 m, which is a good size because that's quite a bit larger than the small capillaries. Individual red cells are about 8e-6 m, which is also about the size of the smallest capillaries. If they plug up capillaries, then they are potentially hazardous. We have set our cut-off at things 10 times this big, which are definitely abnormal. This requirement is assumed to be the smallest size an emboli particle can form.

2. Why must the instrument be powered by a 110 VAC outlet?

There could be some flexibility in the power supply. The ergonomic (tripping) makes sense. It's also just a convenience and practicality thing. If the instrument gets moved to another room or lab for an experiment, I do not want to have to ask for several outlets to make this one instrument operate.

3. Why must the system accept voltage signals from other instruments for synchronization?

A common way for instruments to communicate the time that they are doing things is using an analog voltage. For example, a digital camera might have an output that is normally 0 V, but every time that it takes a picture the voltage will change to 5V for 10 msec or so. Another instrument (like our detector) could then acquire this voltage and use it to synchronize with the rest of the system.

4. What information would you like to be displayed in the Graphical User Interface?

What I was hoping for is that during an experiment (which would last from anywhere between minutes and a few hours) there is some information available to the user that tells him/her that the system is both working and gives some idea of the results. What exact information it displays and how it does this can be worked out through the design process. It's hard for me as the customer to say exactly what should be displayed without knowing what is possible. We will have to talk about the frequency of data collection issue. I would guess that we will be talking about hundreds or thousands of particles/second.

5. What parameters are we characterizing?

We are characterizing the size (Length) and count of the emboli.

6. Can we assume the emboli is spherical, are we measuring the diameter?

Yes, we can make that assumption. The exact size and shape of embolism is not known and can vary based on the human subject.

Relative Importance of the Customer Needs

Needs Summary
Need The Product Needs to Importance
Need 1.1 Thromboemboli Detector Detect individual emboli that are 50 micro (e-6) m or larger 9
Need 1.2 Thromboemboli Detector Characterize the size of the emboli 3
Need 2.1 Thromboemboli Detector Instrument should be able to attach to a variety of test chambers 1
Need 3.1 Thromboemboli Detector Instrument should be powered by one wall (110 VAC) outlet 3
Need 4.1 Thromboemboli Detector All components should form one contained unit 9
Need 4.2 Thromboemboli Detector Size: The total unit should be no larger than 4'x 4' of table 3
Need 4.3 Thromboemboli Detector Weight: Instrument should weigh no more than 20-40 lbs 1
Need 5.1 Thromboemboli Detector Estimate the validity of the emboli detection 9
Need 5.2 Thromboemboli Detector Count the number of emboli detected in a time period 9
Need 5.3 Thromboemboli Detector Record the raw signal for post-processing 9
Need 5.4 Thromboemboli Detector Maintain a record of detected emboli and their size 9
Need 5.5 Thromboemboli Detector Accept voltage signals from other instruments for synchronization. 3
Need 6.1 Thromboemboli Detector Have a simple one screen interface with all controls either displayed on screen or on-screen push buttons 3
Need 6.2 Thromboemboli Detector Include indicators that monitor if the system is working correctly 3
Need 6.3 Thromboemboli Detector Include some display of real-time data 1
Need 7.1 Thromboemboli Detector Using particles of a known sizes and concentrations, confirm that the system performs the above tasks. 9
Need 7.2 Thromboemboli Detector Use these validation experiments to estimate the uncertainty and errors in the system. 9
Need 8.1 Thromboemboli Detector User manual 3
Need 8.2 Thromboemboli Detector Documentation of validation experiments 3

Voice of the Customer, Objective Tree

These objectives should be addressed across a series of projects related to this track. Some individual projects within the track may focus on various areas of these objectives, but all student teams are encouraged to keep the "big picture" in mind, so that their individual project contributions can be more readily integrated with the larger system view.

  1. Constraint Objectives
    • Regulatory Constraints
      • C.1 The design shall comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Measure of Effectiveness: Every team shall identify at least one federal, state, or local law or regulation that may have an impact on the system design. The team shall demonstrate compliance with said regulations. Particular attention shall be paid to OSHA requirements, and safety codes and standards related to rotating equipment.
      • C.2 The design shall comply with all applicable RIT Policies and Procedures. Measure of Effectiveness: The team shall offer their design for review by the RIT Campus Safety office, and shall rigorously follow RIT procedures associated with purchasing and safety.
      • C.3 Wherever practical, the design should follow industry standard codes and standards. Safety codes shall be treated as design requirements. Industry standards should be used wherever practical. Measure of Effectiveness: The team shall identify at least one mechanical and at least one electrical standard complied with during the design process.
    • Academic Constraints
      • C.10 The team shall prepare a technical report, including a set of design drawings and bill of materials supported by engineering analysis.
        • User friendly documentation illustrating how to use the instrumentation properly will also be provided.
      • C.11 The team shall deliver all hardware and software, and demonstrate all hardware and software through experimental test and evaluation data.
    • Safety Constraints
      • C.20 Particular attention shall be paid to equipment safety concerns and electrical safety concerns.
      • C.21 The thromboemboli detector shall have a fail-safe "kill switch".
      • C.22 Human safety takes precedence over all other design objectives.
      • C.23 Building and facilities safety takes precedence over the test stand equipment damage.
      • C.24 The thromboemboli detector should be robust to damage by inexperienced operators.
      • C.25 Exposure to human or serogate blood will be minimized.
        • Biological agents should be properly disposed of.
        • Personal protective equipment will be used as necessary.
  2. Resource Objectives
    • People Resource
      • R.0 The team shall be comprised of 4 EE and 2 ME students.
    • Equipment Resource
      • R.10 The team members should fabricate most custom components on campus, and the design should consider in-house manufacturing resources.
      • R.11 Equipment from the RIT Laser Laboratory will be available to the team provided these resources are necessary.
      • R.12 Equipment from the RIT Blood Pump Laboratory will be available to the team for testing purposes.
    • Time Resource
      • R.20 Each student team member should be expected to work a minimum of 8 and a maximum of 16 hours per week on the project. Each student should ideally spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. The scope of the project has been designed with these limits in mind.
        • Weekly meetings between group members will be held to discuss progress, objectives, and timelines.
      • R.21 The test stand must be demonstrable at the end of Senior Design II in Spring 2007.
  3. Economic Objectives
    • Materials Costs
      • R.30 The total development budget for the roadmap / track is not anticipated to exceed $5,000 during AY06-07.
      • R.31 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of the thromboemboli detector should decrease with decreasing levels of instrumentation, but shall remain capable of being retro-fitted with instrumentation after initial manufacturing.
      • R.32 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of the thromboemboli detector should be borne by the team, faculty member, research project, company, or department desiring to use the item for their research and development work.
    • Labor Costs
      • R.40 The design team is not expected to account for the nominal labor costs of RIT shop personnel as long as the time commitment does not greatly exceed that of other typical SD projects.
      • R.41 The design team is not expected to account for the nominal labor costs of Faculty or other staff assigned to assist and guide then team, as long as the time commitment does not greatly exceed that of other typical SD projects.
    • Amortization Costs
      • R.50 The design team is not expected to recover the investment costs associated with the thromboemboli detector development.
  4. Scope Objectives
    • S.1 The thromboemboli detector shall be a self contained unit.
    • S.2 The thromboemboli detector shall be portable.
    • S.3 The thromboemboli detector shall be capable of being retrofitted.
    • S.4 The thromboemboli detector shall be open architecture (All components must be available from multiple vendors)
    • S.5 The thromboemboli detector shall be open source (All drawings, programs, documentation, data, etc. must be open source published in standard formats)
    • S.6 The thromboemboli detector shall NOT be designed assuming that it is targeted for a commercial product.
    • S.7 The thromboemboli detector design shall be available for use and adoption by other commercially oriented SD teams.
    • S.8 The thromboemboli detector design shall be user friendly.
    • S.9 The thromboemboli detector design shall limit exposure to biological agents.
  5. Technology Objectives
    • T.1 The development of the particle characterization method shall be accomplished first.
    • T.2 The appropriate selection of components for the design will follow suit.
    • T.3 The results of this thromboemboli detector should increase the reputation and visibility of the RIT SD program and our bioengineering technology "skill level" on a national basis.
    • T.4 The preferred energy source is 110 VAC power.
    • T.5 The thromboemboli detector shall be relocatable by one person, and easily transported.

Background Information Provided by the Customer

Useful Web Resources

You may find it helpful to review these web resources:

Check out this Wikipedia Article for some general background information about CHF.

Utilize this online Medical Dictionary for a description of ambiguous medical terms.

Useful information about Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

Initial Concepts to Consider
  1. Use of Lasers for Thromboemoboli Detection
  2. Use of Doppler Ultrasound for Thromboemoboli Detection

Customer Deliverables

Design, build, and fully characterized working prototype of the thromboemboli detector. See the "Detailed Course Deliverables" section for more specifics.

Customer and Sponsor Involvement

The team will be expected to carry out the vast majority of their interactions with the Team Guide (Dr. Day). Dr. Day will be available for a series of meetings during the course of the project. Dr. Day will meet with a group of teams during the beginning of SD1 to lay out common goals, objectives, and philosophies for the sequence of projects being sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood. It is anticipated that Dr. Day will meet with the team (or multiple related teams) for 2 hour meetings approximately 4 times during senior design I, and twice during senior design II. Dr. Day will participate with team communications electronically, through the web site as well.

Regulatory Requirements

Project Budget and Special Procurement Processes

National Institutes of Health, Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood has allocated $5,000 to this project track for the AY06-07. While there is no pre-defined limit for each project within the track, each team in the track must demonstrate that their expenditures are in-line to satisfy both the requirements of the individual project, as well as to set the stage towards completion of the overall objectives of the track.

Each team will be required to keep track of all expenses incurred with their project, and to communicate with members of other teams in the track, to insure that the overall track budget as well as the individual project budgets are being followed.

Purchases for this track will be run through the mechanical engineering procurement system. Dr. Day (Team Guide) for the ME department will be point of contact for most purchases associate with this project and this track. It is recommended that each team appoint one person to act as the purchasing agent for the team, and that all interactions between the team and Dr. Day go through the single purchasing agent. The team is responsible for providing all receipts, copies of invoices, shipping documents, and proper use of tax exempt forms, etc.

Intellectual Property Considerations

All work to be completed by students in this track is expected to be released to the public domain. Students, Faculty, Staff, and other participants in the project will be expected to release rights to their designs, documents, drawings, etc., to the public domain, so that others may freely build upon the results and findings without constraint.

Students, Faculty, and Staff associated with the project are encouraged to publish findings, data, and results openly.

Engineering Specifications

Test Stand Specifications

List of Metrics

The table below presents the metrics that will be used by the team to design against.

List of Metrics
Metric No. Need Nos. Metric Importance Units
1 1.1, 1.2 Particle Characterization 9 micro meter
2 2.1 Connectivity to blood handling devices 1 n/a
3 3.1 Electrical requirements 3 n/a
4 4.1 All components should form one contained unit 3 n/a
5 4.2 Size constraints 1 feet (ft)
6 4.3 Weight constraints 1 pounds (lbs)
7 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4 Data Processing 9 n/a
8 5.5 Accept voltage signals from other instruments for synchronization 3 volts (V)
9 6.1, 6.2 User-friendly interface 3 ease of use (subjective)
10 6.3 Real time data display 3 n/a
11 7.1, 7.2 System Validation 9 % Accuracy
12 8.1, 8.2 Documentation of equipment and logistics of setup 1 ease of use (subjective)
Needs - Metrics Matrix
Needs and Metrics Metric 1 Metric 2 Metric 3 Metric 4 Metric 5 Metric 6 Metric 7 Metric 8 Metric 9 Metric 10 Metric 11 Metric 12
Need 1.1 x
Need 1.2 x
Need 2.1 x
Need 3.1 x
Need 4.1 x
Need 4.2 x
Need 4.3 x
Need 5.1 x
Need 5.2 x
Need 5.3 x
Need 5.4 x
Need 5.5 x
Need 6.1 x
Need 6.2 x
Need 6.3 x
Need 7.1 x
Need 7.2 x
Need 8.1 x
Need 8.2 x

Safety Constraints

Detailed Course Deliverables

Note that this level describes an absolute level of expectation for the design itself, and for the hardware. However, the student team must also meet all requirements related to analysis, documentation, presentations, web sites, and posters, etc. that are implicit to all projects.

Objective: Following the product development process, develop customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design an alpha prototype. Develop a design verification plan and fully document design.

The following tasks should be completed by the end of SD1:

The following tasks should be completed by the end of SD2:

Further Detail:

  1. Phase 0 Planning: SDI project plan / schedule including specific deliverables and due dates (wks 1-3)
  2. Phase 1 Concept Development: Detailed, quantitative target specifications mapped to customer needs. (wks 1-3)
    • EE: Power, voltages, current, cost, size, environmental conditions, noise, detailed performance specifications. All functionality should be defined with quantitative specifications.
    • ME: Design of thromboemboli detector, cost, size, weight, factor of safety, expected life.
    • ISE: System optimization based on specified length, width, and height constraints.
  3. Phase 1 Concept development: Develop multiple concepts (on paper) and select most feasible. Update specifications. Customer Feedback. (wk 4)
    • EE: High level block diagrams, rough schematics, power budget, critical component requirements.
    • ME: Basic functionality, estimates of size/capacity of major components, connections/links between components considered, basic parts list, cost estimates.
    • ISE: System Layout, Process Flow Diagrams, Work Flow Maps, Supply Chain Maps, Quality Control Plan, Supply Chain Management & Ordering Policies, Inventory Holding Locations, Ergonomic Design, Serviceability & Maintainability Design, DFX
  4. Phase 2 System-Level Design: System design including architecture, sub-system definition,interface definition, and more detailed specifications. Appropriate engineering analysis including hand calculations and simulation / modeling. Determine greatest challenges / risks to project (wk 5)
    • EE: More detailed block diagrams, schematics, SPICE simulations, matlab modeling, memory requirements, processor speed calculations.
    • ME: Analysis of components, stress/deflection determination for major components, fatigue analysis, heat flow calculations, control system laid out.
    • ISE: Linear Programming, Queuing Theory, Discrete Event Simulation, Lean Analysis, SPC, Inventory Analysis, Physical Workload Assessment
  5. Phase 2 System-Level Design: Proof of concept breadboard, brassboard, or simulation of high risk technologies defined in 4. Use appropriate discipline specific methods to demonstrate confidence in selected architecture / design approach. Design review including risk assessment for technology / cost / schedule. (wks 6-7)
    • EE: Physical hardware of key / high risk sub-systems
    • ME: Analysis of key / high risk components, simulation of control systems.
    • ISE: Mostly simulation-based or mock-up models
  6. Phase 3 Detail Design: Detailed design to meet all customer needs. All long lead items should be identified for ordering. Design review. (wks 8-9).
    • EE: Final schematics, BOM, detailed SPICE, Matlab, etc. simulations.
    • ME: 3D CAD drawings, mechanical simulations, detailed BOM.
    • ISE: Finalize any outstanding items in, include supporting analysis in coupled with implementation plans, particularly project schedules and risk assessments
  7. Phase 3 Detail Design: Detailed test plan with linkage to engineering specifications and customer needs. The results of this plan should demonstrate the design meets all customer needs and translated engineering specifications (both high level specifications and cascaded sub-system specifications). (wk 10)
    • EE: Step by step plan to fully characterize developed electronic system against all specifications and customer needs.
    • ME: Step by step plan to fully characterize developed mechanical system against all specifications and customer needs.
    • ISE: Step by step plan to fully characterize developed implemented system against all specifications and input requirements.
  8. Phase 3 Detail Design: Project plan for SDII (wk 10).
  9. Phase 3 Detail Design: Project review (wk 10).

Preliminary Work Breakdown

The following roles are not necessarily to be followed by the team. It is merely to justify the number of students from each discipline. The student team is expected to develop their own work breakdown structure, consistent with the general work outline presented in the workshop series at the beginning of SD1. However, the customer requests a level of detail NO GREATER than weekly tasks to be completed by each student team member for the benefit of the other team members. The customer DOES NOT request any level of detail finer than one-week intervals, but will assist the team members if they wish to develop a finer level of detail to support their own efforts.

ME:
  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Calculations (i.e. pressure drops, fluid streses, particle characterization etc.).
  2. Develop design concepts for the thromboemboli detector.
  3. Develop schematics of all system components.
EE:
  1. Hardware and software integration signal processing and data acquisition.
  2. Power electronics (i.e. remote control for kill switch, etc.).
  3. Power (110 VAC outlet)
ISE:
  1. Evaluate system components and determine optimal placement.

Grading and Assessment Scheme

Grading of students in this project will be fully consistent with grading policies established for the SD1 and SD2 courses. The following level describes an absolute level of expectation for the design itself, and for the hardware. However, the student team must also meet all requirements related to analysis, documentation, presentations, web sites, and posters, etc. that are implicit to all projects.

Level D:
The student team will build a basic thromboemboli detection system.
Level C:
The student team will deliver all elements of Level D PLUS: The thromboemboli detector will be self contained and light weight.
Level B:
The student team will deliver all elements of Level D and C PLUS: The thromboemboli detector will be user friendly and retrofittable.
Level A:
The student team will deliver all elements of Level D, C, and B PLUS: the prototypes will exceed the baseline current design in every aspect identified by the customer.

Three-Week SDI Schedule

This project will closely follow the three week project workshop schedule presented in SD1. See the Course Calender for Details.

Team Member Week 0->1 Tasks

(8 Dec 06)

Week 1->2 Tasks

(15 Dec 06)

Week 2->3 Tasks

(22 Dec 06)

ME Team Members
  1. Review Design Concept
    • Read through PRP and supplemental information (2 Days)
  2. Research Light Sources to be used in design (3 Days)
    • Laser
    • LED
    • Other sources?
  3. Conduct benchmarking analysis on potential light sources (to be performed concurrently with Step 2)
  4. Meet to discuss Findings (3+hrs)
  5. Meet with Faculty Guide (1hr)
  1. After light source is selected perform experiments to optimize design constraints
    • Research Federal, State, and RIT regulations that apply/influence to given light source or design. (2 Days)
    • Determine shape of tubing (2 Days, concurrently with c)
      • Circular
      • Compressive (Square)
    • Determine size of tubing (2 Days, concurrently with b)
      • Graph Diameter vs. Voltage attenuation
      • List More Graph Possibilities
    • Any other parameters to be optimized?
  2. Determine Fluid that has similar properties as blood. Match the following properties:
    • Viscosity
    • Density
    • Any other properties that will matter in this application?
  3. Determine how to simulate emboli in the blood.
  1. Design User/System Interface
    • Will the tubing be disposable or reusable
      • Determine cost-effectiveness
  2. Determine physical constraints of user
    • Integrate into design
ISE Team Members
  1. Review Design Concept
    • Read through PRP and supplemental information (2 Days)
  2. Research Light Sources to be used in design (3 Days)
    • Laser
    • LED
    • Other sources?
  3. Conduct benchmarking analysis on potential light sources (to be performed concurrently with Step 2)
  4. Meet to discuss Findings (3+hrs)
  5. Meet with Faculty Guide (1hr)
  1. After light source is selected perform experiments to optimize design constraints
    • Research Federal, State, and RIT regulations that apply/influence to given light source or design. (2 Days)
    • Determine shape of tubing (2 Days, concurrently with c)
      • Circular
      • Compressive (Square)
    • Determine size of tubing (2 Days, concurrently with b)
      • Graph Diameter vs. Voltage attenuation
      • List More Graph Possibilities
    • Any other parameters to be optimized?
  2. Determine Fluid that has similar properties as blood. Match the following properties:
    • Viscosity
    • Density
    • Any other properties that will matter in this application?
  3. Determine how to simulate emboli in the blood.
  1. Design User/System Interface
    • Will the tubing be disposable or reusable
      • Determine cost-effectiveness
  2. Determine physical constraints of user
    • Integrate into design
EE Team Members
  1. Review Design Concept
    • Read through PRP and supplemental information (2 Days)
  2. Identify feasible technology to capture emboli image (3+Days)
    • Pixels
    • Implementation of laser
    • Voltage synchronization
  1. Identify feasible technology to capture emboli image (3+Days)
    • Begin to identify power sources
    • Work with ME's to determine system constraints
  1. Work with ME's to determine GUI requirements
    • Signal Processing
    • Data Acquisition
      • Identify system components
      • Identify required software

In addition, the following tasks should be completed ASAP:

  1. Go over the information on the edge website, from the Design Project Management Artificial Organ Engineering - Family of Projects section.
  2. Visit the RIT Blood Pump Laboratory to gain a better understanding of the overall project scope and objective.

Required Resources

Faculty
Item Source Description Available
Prof. Day ME Faculty Guide/Coordinator/Mentor Yes
Prof. Day ME Customer Yes
Environment
Item Source Description Available
Blood Pump Lab ME 09-2385 Work Space/Storage Yes
ME Shop ME 09-2360 Parts Fabrication Yes
Equipment
Item Source Description Available
Blood Pump RIT Blood Pump Lab Used for Testing Yes
Tubing RIT Blood Pump Lab Used for Testing Yes
LabView RIT Blood Pump Lab Programming/Data Acquisition Yes
Desktop PC Throughout Programming/Data Acquisition Yes

The team members will be expected to procure the materials needed for the project, excluding the following:

Materials
Item Source Description Available
Blood Pump RIT Blood Pump Lab LVAD Implant Yes
TBD TBD TBD Yes