P07203: Dynamometry Lab Infra Structure
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P07203: Dynamometry Lab Infra Structure

This is a project within the Vehicle Systems Technology Track, to develop a Modular, Scalable, Open Architecture Robotic Vehicle Platform. This project is a member of the P07200 Family of Projects.

Staffing Requirements

Staffing
Team Member Discipline Role / Skills email address
Wayne Walter ME Faculty Guide, Will work closely with the team on an on-going basis to facilitate success. wwweme@rit.edu
George Slack EE Faculty Consultant, Will provide EE discipline technical support on an intermittant basis. gbseee@rit.edu
Jeff Webb ME Teaching Assistant jbw3914@rit.edu
Matthew Chabot EE DAQ, On Board Control, and Processing
Jason Hochman EE Safety and Configurability
Matt Antonio EE Project Manager and On Board Power
Eric Chapin ME External Interface and Instrumentation
Craig Hupp ME Structure
Gerald Lim ME Coupling and Test Fixture
Jeremy Wilson ME Dynamometer Loading

Start Term: Fall, 2006-1

End Term: Winter, 2006-2

Customer

Dr. Edward Hensel, PE

Professor and Head

RIT Mechanical Engineering

echeme@rit.edu

Project Overview

Support for this project is generously provided by the Gleason Foundation.

Support for this project is generously provided by the Gleason Foundation.

As automotive technology advances, it is likely that hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles will play an increasingly important role in our transportation systems. The ME department currently operates an Internal Combustion Engine Dynamometer (IC Engine Dyno), located in the engine test cell within the ME machine shop. The ME department does not currenly have any Chassis Dyno capabilities.

The mission of this project is to develop a small scale Chassis Dyno appopriate for use with the 10kg and 100kg payload robotic platforms currently being developed under this project track. Additionally, it is desireable for this Chassis Dyno to be able to characterize the performance of any robot used by high school teams competing in the RIT-hosted Finger Lakes Regional FIRST robotics competition each spring. The Chassis Dyno should be scalable (to 1kg and 1,000kg payload variants), modular in design, open architecture, open source, and fully instrumented for use in a variety of education, research & development, and outreach applications within and beyond the RIT KGCOE.

This is a project within the Vehicle Systems Technology Track, to develop a Modular, Scalable, Open Architecure Robotic Vehicle Platform. A critical element of the track is to develop an infra-structure to support the dnyamometry needs of the vehicles under development. In addition, this project should provide the foundation for the dynamometry needs of the ME department at RIT, and in particular the automotive option of the ME program.

A number of other projects are intimately related to this project, as summarized in the list below.

Related Project Title Start Term End Term
P07200 Vehicle Systems Technology Track 2006-1 On-going
P07201 Motor Module - Robotic Platform 10 kg (RP10) 2006-1 TBD
P07202 Motor Module - Robotic Platform 100 kg (RP100) 2006-1 TBD
P07301 Systems and Controls: Sensors 2006-1 TBD
P07302 Systems and Controls: Actuators 2006-1 TBD
P07303 Systems and Controls: Wireless Communications 2006-1 TBD

Detailed Project Description

Customer Needs

The mission of this project is to develop a small scale Chassis Dyno appopriate for use with the 10kg and 100kg payload robotic platforms currently being developed under this project track. Additionally, it is desireable for this Chassis Dyno to be able to characterize the performance of any robot used by high school teams competing in the RIT-hosted Finger Lakes Regional FIRST robotics competition each spring. The Chassis Dyno should be scalable (to 1kg and 1,000kg payload variants), modular in design, open architecture, open source, and fully instrumented for use in a variety of education, research & development, and outreach applications within and beyond the RIT KGCOE.

The primary customer, Dr. Edward Hensel, representing the mechanical engineering department of RIT, has expressed his objectives for the design project using an Objective Tree tool, as outlined in the following section.

Voice of the Customer, Objective Tree

These objectives should be addressed across a series of projects related to this track. Some individual projects within the track may focus on various areas of these objectives, but all student teams are encouraged to keep the "big picture" in mind, so that their individual project contributions can be more readily integrated with the larger system view.

  1. Constraint Objectives
    • Regulatory Constraints
      • C.1 The design shall comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Measure of Effectiveness: Every team shall identify at least one federal, state, or local law or regulation that may have an impact on the system design. The team shall demonstrate compliance with said regulations. Particular attention shall be paid to OSHA requirements, and safety codes and standards related to rotating equipment.
      • C.2 The design shall comply with all applicable RIT Policies and Procedures. Measure of Effectiveness: The team shall offer their design for review by the RIT Campus Safety office, and shall rigorously follow RIT procedures associated with purchasing and safety.
      • C.3 Wherever practical, the design should follow industry standard codes and standards. Safety codes shall be treated as design requirements. Industry standards should be used wherever practical. Measure of Effectiveness: The team shall identify at least one mechanical and at least one electrical standard complied with during the design process.
    • Academic Constraints
      • C.10 The team shall prepare a technical report, including a set of design drawings and bill of materials supported by engineering analysis.
      • C.11 The team shall deliver all hardware and software, and demonstrate all hardware and software through experimental test and evaluation data.
    • Safety Constraints
      • C.20 Particular attention shall be paid to rotating equipment safety concerns and electrical safety concerns.
      • C.21 Each dyno shall have a fail-safe "kill switch".
      • C.22 Human safety takes precedence over all other design objectives.
      • C.23 Building and facilities safety takes precedence over dyno equipment damage.
      • C.24 The dyno should be robust to damage by inexperienced operators.
  2. Resource Objectives
    • People Resource
      • R.0 The team shall be comprised of 4 EE and 2 ME students.
    • Equipment Resource
      • R.10 The team members should fabricate most custom components on campus, and the design should consider in-house manufacturing resources.
    • Time Resource
      • R.20 Each student team member should be expected to work a minimum of 8 and a maximum of 16 hours per week on the project. Each student should ideally spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. The scope of the project has been designed with these limits in mind.
      • R.21 The chassis dyno must be demonstrable at the Spring 2006 Finger Lakes FIRST Regional Robotics Compeition, hosted at the Gordon Field House over Spring break.
  3. Economic Objectives
    • Materials Costs
      • R.30 The total development budget for the roadmap / track is not anticipated to exceed $15,000 during AY06-07 and 07-08 for first article prototypes of each project. The distribution of this amount between projects in the track is negotiable.
      • R.31 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of a dyno should decrease with increasing volume.
      • R.33 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of a dyno should decrease with decreasing levels of instrumentation, but shall remain capable of being retro-fitted with instrumentation after initial manufacturing.
      • R.34 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of a dyno should be borne by the team, faculty member, research project, company, or department desiring to use the item for their research and development work.
    • Labor Costs
      • R.40 The design team is not expected to account for the nominal labor costs of RIT shop personnel as long as the time commitment does not greatly exceed that of other typical SD projects.
      • R.41 The design team is not expected to account for the nominal labor costs of TA's, Faculty, or other staff assigned to assist and guide then team, as long as the time commitment does not greatly exceed that of other typical SD projects.
    • Amortization Costs
      • R.50 The design team is not expected to recover the investment costs associated with the platform development.
  4. Scope Objectives
    • S.1 The dyno(s) shall be applicable to 10 kg and 100kg robotic platforms.
    • S.2 The dyno(s) shall be scalable down to a 1 kg payload variants.
    • S.3 The dyno(s) shall be scalable down up to a 1,000 kg payload variants.
    • S.3 The dyno(s) shall be open architecture (All COTS components must be available from multiple vendors)
    • S.4 The dyno(s) shall be open source (All drawings, programs, documentation, data, etc. must be open source published in standard formats)
    • S.5 The dyno(s) shall be manufacturable in lots as small as one and as large as 10.
    • S.6 The dyno(s) shall NOT be designed assuming that it is targeted for a commercial product.
    • S.7 The dyno design shall be available for use and adoption by other commercially oriented SD teams.
  5. Technology Objectives
    • T.1 The 10 Kg and 100 kg robotic platform motor modules shall be designed first.
    • T.2 The 1 and 1,000 Kg robotic platform motor modules shall be designed second.
    • T.3 The results of this dyno development should increase the reputation and visibility of the RIT SD program and our robotics technology "skill level" on a national basis.
    • T.4 The preferred motion control technology is control by wire.
    • T.5 The preferred energy source is 110 VAC power.
    • T.6 The dyno shall be relocatable by two people, and easily transported through single-width doorways, etc.

Voice of the Engineer, Function Tree

The student members of the team are asked to translate the customer requirements into engineering design specifications. The customer wishes for the student team to develop a complete "Voice of the Engineer" document, and prepare a House of Quality which demonstrates how each customer objective has been effectively mapped to one or more engineering specifications.

The student team may then demonstrate that they have satisfied the customer objectives through measurement and demonstration of satisfying each engineering performance specification. The team should meet with the customer by the mid-point of SD1 to review the house of quality and confirm that the house of quality and engineering specifications adequately capture the customer's intent as expressed by the objective tree.

Concept Development

Useful Web Resources

You may find it helpful to review these web resources to get comfortable with motor characterization and dynamometry.

Check out this Wikipedia Article for some general background information about dynamometry.

Land and Sea Corporation Dynamometers Commercially available dynos are presented here.

Presentation on Robot Motor Selection This slide show presents a nice overview of how to interpret a DC motor response curve. Using a dynamometer, your team will be able to create motor response curves similar to these, for other people to interpret and use.

Getting the Most from Motors powerpoint slide show and tutorial from US FIRST.

Reliance Electric Motor Information Center

Initial Concepts to Consider

  1. EE Electric Machines DC Motor Dynamometer (previously given to EET by EE)
  2. Team Designed and built DC Motor Dyno
  3. Team Designed and built Motor Module Dyno
  4. Team Designed and built wheel-drive chassis dyno
  5. Team Designed and built treadmill type chassis dyno

Customer Specified Deliverables

The standard deliverable schedule for SD1 projects shall apply. Please see the Detailed Project Deliverable section below for more information.

Customer and Sponsor Involvement

The team will be expected to carry out the vast majority of their interactions with the Team Guide (Dr. Walter), and the teaching assistant (Jeff Webb). Dr. Hensel (The sponsor and customer) will be available for a series of meetings during the course of the project. Dr. Hensel will meet with a group of teams during the beginning of SD1 to lay out common goals, objectives, and philosophies for the sequence of projects being sponsored by the Gleason Foundation gift to the ME Department. It is anticipate that Dr. Hensel will meet with the team (or multiple related teams) for 2 hour meetings approximately 4 times during senior design 1, and twice during senior design 2. Dr. Hensel will participate with team communications electronically, through the web site as well.

Regulatory Requirements

Project Budget and Special Procurement Processes

The ME Department has allocated $15,000 to this project track for AY05-06 and AY06-07. While there is no pre-defined limit for each project within the track, each team in the track must demonstrate that their expenditures are in-line to satisfy both the requirements of the individual project, as well as to set the stage towards completion of the overall objectives of the track.

Each team will be required to keep track of all expenses incurred with their project, and to communicate with members of other teams in the track, to insure that the overall track budget as well as the individual project budgets are being followed.

Purchases for this track will be run through the mechanical engineering procurement system. Dave Hathaway (Operations Manager) for the ME department will be point of contact for most purchases associate with this project and this track. It is recommended that each team appoint one person to act as the purchasing agent for the team, and that all interactions between the team and Dave go through the single purchasing agent. The team is responsible for providing all receipts, copies of invoices, shipping documents, and proper use of tax exempt forms, etc.

Intellectual Property Considerations

All work to be completed by students in this track is expected to be released to the public domain. Students, Faculty, Staff, and other participants in the project will be expected to release rights to their designs, documents, drawings, etc., to the public domain, so that others may freely build upon the results and findings without constraint.

Students, Faculty, and Staff associated with the project are encouraged to publish findings, data, and results openly.

Other

No other information is available or necessary at this time.

Detailed Project Deliverables

These deliverable levels shall be "Paper Design Deliverables" for SD1 performance, and "Hardware/Software Deliverables" for SD2. Note that this level describes an absolute level of expectation for the design itself, and for the hardware. However, the student team must also meet all requirements related to analysis, documentation, presentations, web sites, and posters, etc. that are implicit to all projects.

Level D: The student team will deliver a working small motor dyno interfaced to a computer data acquisition system, capable of providing data for a range of DC motors to fully charactertize the motor response curves. The dyno shall be used to characterize at least two motors typical of project P07201 and at least two motors typical of project P07202, complete with error analysis. The student team may freely use all components from the baseline motor dyno provided by the EE department.

Level C: The student team will deliver a working small motor dyno interfaced to a computer data acquisition system, capable of providing data for a range of DC motors to fully charactertize the motor response curves. The dyno shall be used to characterize at least two motors typical of project P07201 and at least two motors typical of project P07202, complete with error analysis. The student team will develop a 100% open architecture, open source motor dyno using no proprietary components, and only COTS components available from multiple manufacturers.

Level B: The student team will deliver a working small motor MODULE dyno interfaced to a computer data acquisition system, capable of providing data for a range of DC motors to fully charactertize the motor response curves. The dyno shall be used to characterize at least three motor module configurations typical of project P07201 and at least three motor module configurations typical of project P07202, complete with error analysis. The student team will develop a 100% open architecture, open source motor MODULE dyno using no proprietary components, and only COTS components available from multiple manufacturers. The student team will characterize the response of motor MODULES, comprised of the motor alone, and the motor plus a transmission (gearbox, belt drive, chain drive, etc), and the motor plus a transmission plus a wheel (at least wheel diameters per configuration).

Level A: The student team will deliver all elements of Level D, B, and C PLUS: The student team will deliver a working robot CHASSIS DYNO interfaced to a computer data acquisition system, capable of providing data for a range of robot platforms weighing up to 200 kg, and as little as 2 kg. The dyno shall be used to characterize at least three robots. Dr. Hensel will arrange for at least three High School FIRST robotics platforms to loan their robots for characterization. The student team will develop a 100% open architecture, open source CHASSIS dyno using no proprietary components, and only COTS components available from multiple manufacturers. The student team will characterize the response of ROBOTS and provide one report of their technical findings to each high school team.

Preliminary Work Breakdown

The student team is expected to develop their own work breakdown structure, consistent with the general work outline presented in the workshop series at the beginning of SD1. However, the customer requests a level of detail NO GREATER than weekly tasks to be completed by each student team member for the benefit of the other team members. The customer DOES NOT request any level of detail finer than one-week intervals, but will assist the team members if they wish to develop a finer level of detail to support their own efforts.

Grading and Assessment Scheme

Grading of students in this project will be fully consistent with grading policies established for the SD1 and SD2 courses.

Three Week SD1 Schedule

This project will closely follow the three week project workshop schedule presented in SD1.

Required Resources (Faculty, Environment, Equipment)

Faculty Resources

Item Source Description Available
Prof. Walter ME Faculty Guide/Coordinator/Mentor Yes
Prof. Hensel ME Customer Yes
Prof. Slack EE Technical Consultant Yes

Environment

Item Source Description Available
Robotics Lab ME 09-2nnn Work Space for Team Yes
Sr Design Lab EE 09-3xxx Work Space for Team Yes
Dyno Lab ME 09-1nnn Final Product Destination Fall 2007

Equipment

Item Source Description Available
DC Motor Dyno EE Electric Machines Lab Unknown
USB Interface ME MIC Lab Starting DAQ Interface Yes
Desktop PC EE Dept Unknown

Materials

The team members will be expected to procure the materials needed for the project.

Item Source Description Available (Mark X)

Other

Item Source Description Available (Mark X)

Documents

What to Bring to Weekly Meetings

Senior Design 1 Schedule

Dyno Team Documents

Project Website

P07203: Dynamometry Lab Infra Structure Website