P08203: DC Motor Dynamometer
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Identify Customer Needs

Table of Contents

Step 1. Gather Raw Data From Customers

Interactions with Customers

First Sponsor Interview
Interviewers: Chris Abramo
Sponsor: Mr. Edward Hensel PE
Date 3 April 2007, Office
Interviewer: What will this project hope to accomplish?
Sponsor: To develop a scalable DC motor dyno as a continuation of the previous design project PO7203, capable of measuring typical dynamometer values for a DC motor. Currently the ME department uses a large scale IC engine dyno. But with the increasing popularity of hybrid/electric vehicles, the RIT ME department would like to have the capabilities to offer the students hands on experience with DC electric motor characterization.
Interviewer: How is this project different from the previous project? Is it the same with continuing improvement or is it a total new design from the ground up?
Sponsor: In the previous project the students involved where given the task of developing both a motor dyno and a chassis dyno. For this project, though, the students will focus only on further developing the DC motor dyno. The students involved should thoroughly investigate the previous design to determine which areas need improvement and/or re-design. The students will have full access to previous data and documentation.
Interviewer: What was good or bad about the previous project?
Sponsor: There wasn't really any "bad parts", it just didn't operate to the level desirable in order to integrate it into a ME class. On problem was that all the inputs were not isolated. Meaning that it was difficult to determine if a component was being damaged. This resulted in the control board being fried. Therefore a key objective to this project will be to have isolated inputs for all measurable values.Another down fall was the rigidity of the platform for the motor. The platform was not cable of handling the level of torque that is desired. When a somewhat larger engine was being tested the platform would twist and bend under the load. The new design should allow for a factor of safety of about five from the largest measured torque.
Interviewer: What kind of staffing is needed?
Sponsor: In the previous design group there were 3 Electrical engineers and 4 mechanical engineers. This may be what is required for this project, but will be more dependent on the amount of personal available. This project does not have to be limited to just EE and ME other fields can be added but again will be dependent on the availability.
Interviewer: Who are the main contacts?
Sponsor: Myself (Dr. Hensel) and also anyone else that was involved in the previous design. Jeff Webb was the previous teaching assistant and would have a good knowledge of what was done
Interviewer: What are the key design attributes of this project?
Sponsor: The key attributes are similar to the previous project. It should be scalable with the ability to handle engines ranging from small 1/2-2 hp engines up to larger applications. It should also be modular in design, open architecture, open source, and fully instrumented for use in a variety of education, research & development, and outreach applications within and beyond the RIT KGCOE.
Interviewer: Who will use this project?
Sponsor: I am hoping to use this dyno as a lab for some of our automotive classes offered as part of the automotive track. We would like to offer it as a lab on the IC engine class or possibly a new hybrid electric vehicle class. This will also be used as a test platform for some of the other robotic projects. There are a variety of applications that this dyno will be used for.
Interviewer: What is the budget?
Sponsor: The budget will be discussed at the start of the project, but will be within reason

Design Objectives, Design Constraints, and Customer Needs

Voice of the Customer, Objective Tree

These objectives should be addressed across a series of projects related to this track. Some individual projects within the track may focus on various areas of these objectives, but all student teams are encouraged to keep the "big picture" in mind, so that their individual project contributions can be more readily integrated with the larger system view.

1 Constraint Objectives
1.1 Regulatory Constraints
1.1.1 The design shall comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Measure of Effectiveness: Every team shall identify at least one federal, state, or local law or regulation that may have an impact on the system design. The team shall demonstrate compliance with said regulations. Particular attention shall be paid to OSHA requirements, and safety codes and standards related to rotating equipment.
1.1.2 The design shall comply with all applicable RIT Policies and Procedures. Measure of Effectiveness: The team shall offer their design for review by the RIT Campus Safety office, and shall rigorously follow RIT procedures associated with purchasing and safety.
1.1.3 Wherever practical, the design should follow industry standard codes and standards. Safety codes shall be treated as design requirements. Industry standards should be used wherever practical. Measure of Effectiveness: The team shall identify at least one mechanical and at least one electrical standard complied with during the design process.
1.2 Academic Constraints
1.2.1 The team shall prepare a technical report, including a set of design drawings and bill of materials supported by engineering analysis.
1.2.2 The team shall deliver all hardware and software, and demonstrate all hardware and software through experimental test and evaluation data.
2 Resource Objectives
2.1 Equipment Resource
2.1.1 The team members should fabricate most custom components on campus, and the design should consider in-house manufacturing resources.
2.2 Time Resource
2.2.1 Each student team member should be expected to work a minimum of 8 and a maximum of 16 hours per week on the project. Each student should ideally spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. The scope of the project has been designed with these limits in mind.
3 Economic Objectives
3.1 Materials Costs
3.1.1 The total development budget for this project is not anticipated to exceed $3,000. during 07-08.
3.1.2 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of a dyno should decrease with increasing volume.
3.1.3 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of a dyno should decrease with decreasing levels of instrumentation, but shall remain capable of being retro-fitted with instrumentation after initial manufacturing.
3.1.4 The cost to manufacture subsequent copies of a dyno should be borne by the team, faculty member, research project, company, or department desiring to use the item for their research and development work.
3.2 Labor Costs
3.1.1 The design team is not expected to account for the nominal labor costs of RIT shop personnel as long as the time commitment does not greatly exceed that of other typical SD projects.
3.1.2 The design team is not expected to account for the nominal labor costs of TA's, Faculty, or other staff assigned to assist and guide then team, as long as the time commitment does not greatly exceed that of other typical SD projects.

Customer Needs

1 Safety
1.1 Human safety takes precedence over all other design objectives.
1.2 Building and facilities safety takes precedence over dyno equipment damage.
1.3 OSHA compliant
1.4 Follows all federal, state, and local laws/regulations
1.5 Follows all RIT policies and regulations
1.6 Takes into account safety of user as well as the facility
1.7 Must have a safety kill switch
1.8 Particular attention shall be paid to rotating equipment safety concerns and electrical safety concerns.
2 Scalability
2.1 The dyno shall be applicable to the motors used on the 1 kg and 100kg robotic platforms(See Notes for motor specifications).
2.2 The dyno shall be scalable down to the drive motor used on the 1 kg platform ( 10 kg steering motor).
2.3 The dyno shall be capable of not being damaged by torque values of five times the torque produced by the drive motor used on the 100kg platform.
3 Reproductivity
3.1 The dyno shall be open architecture
3.2 COTS parts used
3.3 The dyno shall be open source (All drawings, programs, documentation, data, etc. must be open source published in standard formats)
3.4 The dyno shall NOT be designed assuming that it is targeted for a commercial product.
3.5 The dyno design shall be available for use and adoption by other commercially oriented SD teams.
3.6 User serviceable
3.7 Replaceable parts
4 Usability
4.1 Robust for inexperienced users
4.2 Simple software interface
4.3 Easy to set up and tear down
4.4 Limit noise and vibration while in use (no hearing protection needed)
4.5 User manual that is continuously updated
4.6 Unit is capable of providing sufficient power for the required motors
5 Physical constraints
5.1 Must fit through a standard door and be cart portable
5.2 Can be easily moved by two people (OSHA)
6 Data collection/computer interface
6.1 Possibly USB interface with computer
6.2 User friendly
6.3 Must provide curve characterization capabilities
6.4 Must allow for data transmission
6.5 Must be capable of collecting data values of a typical dyno (torque, RPM, Load, Power,etc)
6.6 Isolated inputs for individual electrical dyno components in order to prevent possible damage to these components during operation.
6.7 Automatic system shut down if any of the data values exceeds damaging limits or specified safety limits.
7 Units ability to be serviced
7.1 Easy to disassemble
7.2 Parts easy to replace
7.3 Easy to access all major components
7.4 Service manual
7.5 CAD drawings with documentation
7.6 Overall modular design

Step 4. Establish the Relative Importance of the Needs

Needs Summary
Need The Product Needs to Importance
Need 1.1 DC Motor Dynamometer Human safety takes precedence over all other design objectives. 9
Need 1.2 DC Motor Dynamometer Building and facilities safety takes precedence over dyno equipment damage. 9
Need 1.3 DC Motor Dynamometer OSHA compliant 9
Need 1.4 DC Motor Dynamometer Follows all federal, state, and local laws/regulations 9
Need 1.5 DC Motor Dynamometer Follows all RIT policies and regulations 9
Need 1.6 DC Motor Dynamometer Takes into account safety of user as well as the facility 9
Need 1.7 DC Motor Dynamometer Must have a safety kill switch 9
Need 1.8 DC Motor Dynamometer Particular attention shall be paid to rotating equipment safety concerns and electrical safety concerns. 9
Need 2.1 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno shall be applicable to the motors used on the 1 kg and 100kg robotic platforms. 9
Need 2.2 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno shall be scalable down to the drive motor used on the 1 kg platform ( 10 kg steering motor). 9
Need 2.3 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno shall be capable of not being damaged by torque values of five times the torque produced by the drive motor used on the 100kg platform. 9
Need 3.1 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno shall be open architecture 3
Need 3.2 DC Motor Dynamometer COTS parts used 3
Need 3.3 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno shall be open source (All drawings, programs, documentation, data, etc. must be open source published in standard formats) 1
Need 3.4 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno shall NOT be designed assuming that it is targeted for a commercial product 1
Need 3.5 DC Motor Dynamometer The dyno design shall be available for use and adoption by other commercially oriented SD teams. 1
Need 3.6 DC Motor Dynamometer User serviceable 3
Need 3.7 DC Motor Dynamometer Replaceable parts 3
Need 4.1 DC Motor Dynamometer Robust for inexperienced users 3
Need 4.2 DC Motor Dynamometer Simple software interface 9
Need 4.3 DC Motor Dynamometer Easy to set up and tear down 3
Need 4.4 DC Motor Dynamometer Limit noise and vibration while in use (no hearing protection needed) 3
Need 4.5 DC Motor Dynamometer User manual that is continuously updated 3
Need 4.6 DC Motor Dynamometer Unit is capable of providing sufficient power for the required motors 9
Need 5.1 DC Motor Dynamometer Must fit through a standard door and be cart portable 9
Need 5.2 DC Motor Dynamometer Can be easily moved by two people (OSHA) 9
Need 6.1 DC Motor Dynamometer Possibly USB interface with computer 3
Need 6.2 DC Motor Dynamometer User friendly 9
Need 6.3 DC Motor Dynamometer Must provide curve characterization capabilities 9
Need 6.4 DC Motor Dynamometer Must allow for data transmission 9
Need 6.5 DC Motor Dynamometer Must be capable of collecting data values of a typical dyno (torque, RPM, Load, Power,etc) 9
Need 6.6 DC Motor Dynamometer Isolated inputs for individual electrical dyno components in order to prevent possible damage to these components during operation. 9
Need 6.7 DC Motor Dynamometer Automatic system shut down if any of the data values exceeds damaging limits or specified safety limits. 9
Need 7.1 DC Motor Dynamometer Easy to disassemble 3
Need 7.2 DC Motor Dynamometer Parts easy to replace 3
Need 7.3 DC Motor Dynamometer Easy to access all major components 3
Need 7.4 DC Motor Dynamometer Service manual 9
Need 7.5 DC Motor Dynamometer CAD drawings with documentation 9
Need 7.6 DC Motor Dynamometer Overall modular design 9

Step 5. Reflect on the Results and the Process

Planning

Mission Statement

Staffing Requirements

Intellectual Property Considerations

Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure

Team Values and Norms

Grading and Assessment Scheme

Required Resources

Notes

Concept Development

Identify Customer Needs

Establish Target Specifications

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