P08205: RP 1 Motor Module First Generation
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Identify Customer Needs

Table of Contents

Step 1. Gather Raw Data From Customers

Interactions with Customers

1. First Primary Customer Interview: Dr. E. Hensel, P.E. (ME)
Interviewers: Jason A. Kenyon
Date: 20 September 2007, Dr. Hensel's Office
Transcript of Dr Hensel Interview - 9-20-07
2. Faculty Guide Interview: Dr. Walter
Interviewers: Jason A. Kenyon, Wendy Fung, Jasen Lomnick, Hoai-Nam Nguyen
Date: 24 September 2007, Robotics Laboratory
Notes on Dr. Walter Interview - 9/24/07
3. RP100 Platform Project Leader Interview: Arnold Gomez, ME
Interviewers: Emilien Barrault, Wendy Fung, Jason Kenyon, Jasen Lomnick, Hoai-Nam Nguyen
Date: 28 September 2007, Robotics Lab and Senior Design Conference Room
Transcript of Arnold Gomez Interview
4. RP100 Motor Module Project Leader Interview: Nicholos Mackos, ME
Interviewers: Emilien Barrault, Wendy Fung, Jasen Lomnick
Date: 29 September 2007, Java Wally's
Notes on Interview with Nicholos Mackos
5. Second Primary Customer Interview: Dr. E. Hensel, P.E. (ME)
Interviewers: Jason A. Kenyon, Wendy Fung
Date: 2 October 2007, Building 9, 4th Floor Common Room
Notes on Dr Hensel Interview - 10-2-07
6. RP100 Platform: Jesse Baker, ME
Interviewer: Wendy Fung
Date: 2 October 2007, Phone
Notes on Interview with Jesse Baker
7. RP10 Motor Module: Andy Bucci, EE
Interviewer: Wendy Fung
Date: 2 October 2007, Phone
Notes on Interview with Andy Bucci
8. Large Group Interview: Dr. E. Hensel, P.E. (ME), Dr. W. Walter (ME), Dr. D. Phillips (EE)
Interviewers: Emilien Barrault, Wendy Fung, Jason Kenyon, Jasen Lomnick, Hoai-Nam Nguyen
Date: 11 October 2007, Robotics Laboratory
Transcript and Notes on Large Group Interview - 10-11-07

Step 2. Interpret Raw Data in Terms of Customer Needs

Customer Needs Interpreted from First Primary Customer Interview
1) Design should have smooth operation
2) Design should be open source and open architecture
3) Design should be available to researchers, student clubs, or anybody who needs a robotic motor module
4) Design should be modular: can put any motor module on any position on platform, with any amount of motor modules mounted on that platform
5) Design should power a robotic platform capable of carrying 1kg
6) Design should readily be published for anybody to access with all the information needed to build one
7) Design should reuse design knowledge from past motor module projects in that teams will take the best features and move them forward and improve others (evolutionary, not revolutionary)
8) Design should have an infinite azimuthal steering angle
9) Design should give feedback to the controller on steering angle and drive motor rotation
10) Design should be easily recognizable as being a similar design concept to other RP motor modules
11) Project family structure should promote cross-team collaboration
12) Project goals should reflect work feasible for teams to accomplish within the project life
13) Design should minimize weight and size appropriate to load capacity
14) Design should accommodate easy installation and removal of wear items
15) Design should minimize disassembly needed for component replacement
16) Design should have the option for multiple wheels
17) Design should have a professional look and feel
18) Design should be robust and rugged
Customer Needs Interpreted from Second Primary Customer Interview
1) Any motor module should fit on any platform and operate in a similar manner
2) All designs should use the same client software
3) All designs should utilize the same physical, electrical, and controls interface with the platform
4) All designs should share common key components such as wheels and motors
Customer Needs Interpreted from Large Group Interview
1) Module is at least able to be driven by a function generator and feedback read by an oscilloscope
2) Module can be controlled by a communications protocol
3) Module can be individually addressable on a network
4) All motor module designs must use a PWM signal to drive the drive and steering motors
5) PWM signal that drives motors can be delivered by more than 1 different type of protocol
6) Teams focused on communications protocols should take different routes and use different protocols to drive the motor modules
7) Every team must deliver a motor module but can have different focuses elsewhere than the mechanical design
8) Teams that make their own motor controller must have the same bolt pattern and electrical connectors as a COTS motor controller that other teams buy
9) Team setup must be robust in that there are numerous options for fabricating or purchasing parts for backups so that there is security in the success of teams
10) Recruitment of students with a background in Power Systems is important (especially EE's)
11) Recruitment of students with a background in PWM is important
12) All motor module designs should have a common mounting, electrical and controls arrangement (eg. Bolt pattern, connector, etc) to assure the ability to interchange any team's module on a single platform design
13) The ability to have ANY motor module designs on a single platform at the same time and drive the platform
14) The ability to have a subset of motor modules drive a single platform at the same time and drive the platform
15) The ability to have a number of motor modules of the exact same design drive a platform
16) All motor module designs should have a common mounting height
17) Design can be powered by a DC Power source
18) A standard test fixture for the motor modules should be built early on in the design process so teams know what they are designing to and have an easy way to test their modules

Step 3. Organize the Needs into a Hierarchy

Complete listing of customer needs organized by category

Interchangeability

Project Scope

DFMA

Physical Attributes

Team Structure

Design Constraints

Objective Tree
Objective Tree based on Needs Hierarchy

Objective Tree based on Needs Hierarchy

Step 4. Establish the Relative Importance of the Needs

The following were chosen as some of the more important needs by faculty guides:

  1. Design should be open source and open architecture
  2. Design should power a robotic platform capable of carrying 1kg
  3. Design should reuse knowledge from past motor module projects in that teams will take the best features and move them forward and improve others (evolutionary, not revolutionary)
  4. Design should have infinite steering angle around a vertical axis
  5. Design should be easily recognizable as being a similar design concept to other RP motor modules
  6. Project goals should reflect work feasible for teams to accomplish within the project life
  7. Design should accommodate easy installation and removal of wear items
  8. All designs should utilize the same physical, electrical, and controls interface with the platform
  9. Encoder signal feedback to Micro Controller needed for navigation
  10. All motor module designs should have a common mounting, electrical, and controls arrangement (eg. Bolt pattern, connector, etc) to assure the ability to interchange any team's module on a single platform design
  11. A standard test fixture for the motor modules should be built very early on in the design process so teams know what they are designing to and have an easy way to test their modules

Step 5. Reflect on the Results and the Process

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Planning Mission Statement -- Staffing Requirements -- Intellectual Property Considerations -- Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure -- Team Values and Norms -- Grading and Assessment Scheme -- Required Resources
Concept Development Identify Customer Needs -- Establish Target Specifications -- Generate Product Concepts -- Select Product Concept(s) -- Test Product Concept(s) -- Set Final Specifications
System Level Design Product Architecture
Detail Design Design for Manufacturing and Assembly -- Robust Design -- Design for the Environment and Sustainability -- Design for Reliability -- Design for Safety
Testing and Refinement Prototyping