P13622: Emulsion Reactor
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Construction and Operating Manual

Construction and Operating Manual

Construction

The frame of the reactor was constructed out of slotted angle zinc coated steel and held together with stainless steel bolts, nuts, and washers. The slotted angle steel was ideal for the frame with pre-machined holes increasing construction and adjustment feasibility. Once these were cut, the frame was built around the vessel in order to secure the vessel as much as possible. The majority of the weight is supported by the angle steel but since the vessel was round, sheets of stainless steel were cut to fit the vessel diameter and then bolted to the angle steel. This spread the support evenly around the circumference of the neck. The vessel was also supported at the bottom by an additional sheet of stainless steel for added stability. The bottom support keeps the vessel level and also works as a back up support to hold some of the weight if needed. Once the sheets of stainless steel were cut with a round hole, the circumference of the circle was padded with rubber weather seal to give the vessel a soft surface to contact the frame. Since the frame was 4 ft. tall and only 1ft. wide, it was mounted to a 2 ft. square base to keep it from being too unstable. The base was also assembled with 4 rubber wheels with brakes so that the reactor could be mobile, but still able to be secured in one place. The motor was mounted to the frame by bolting the mounting plate on the back of the motor to the angle steel and also by resting the bracket on the front of the motor onto a piece of angle steel. In order to attach the mixing blade to the motor, a ¾ in. diameter stainless steel rod was machined to fit into the motor’s chuck on one end and machined to fit the mixing blade on the other. The end for the blade was machined down to the size of the hole in the center of the blade and then threaded to give a way of securing the blade to the rod. The end for the chuck of the motor was machined down to be the exact size of the rod coming out of the motor so that there would be no offset in the center of rotation. The sub-feeding for the vessel began with installing a ½ in. straight connector to a 4 in. PVC slip cap. This was achieved by drilling a hole into the center of the cap and then sealing the connector into the hole with PVC cement. Once sealed, this cap was then attached to a 4 in. PVC pipe with PVC cement. This assembly would serve as our sub-feeding tank. The tank was fed into the vessel using a ½ in. polyethylene pipe, ½ in. pinch clamps, and a ball valve. In order to stabilize the pipe inside the tank, two ¼ in. dia. stainless steel rods were secured to the frame above the vessel and the pipe was secured between them. This allowed the tank to feed directly to the mixing blade creating a better emulsion.

Complete Reactor

Complete Reactor

Rigging with Vessel

Rigging with Vessel

Close up of Motor Chuck

Close up of Motor Chuck

Close up of Motor Control and Display

Close up of Motor Control and Display

Close up of Sub Feeding Tank

Close up of Sub Feeding Tank

Reactor Vessel

Reactor Vessel

Operator Instruction Manual

Operator Instruction Manual

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