P16420: Lip Balm and Hand Salve Production Process Improvement
/public/

Systems Design

Table of Contents

Systems Level Design Documents

Executive Summary
Now that P16420 knows exactly what its tasked with, it proceeds to solidify the idea of how the solution system will look like

Team Vision for System-Level Design Phase

Functional Decomposition

Functional Decomposition

Functional Decomposition

Product Architecture

Product Architecture

Product Architecture

Benchmarking

Benchmarking

Benchmarking

Concept Development

Morphological Chart

Morphological Chart

Morphological Chart

Concept Selection

1st Iteration:

Concept A

Concept A

Concept B

Concept B

Concept C

Concept C

Concept D

Concept D

Pugh 1-A

Pugh 1-A

Pugh 1-B

Pugh 1-B

Pugh 1-C

Pugh 1-C

2nd Iteration:

Design A

Design A

Hybrid Design B

Hybrid Design B

Pugh 2-A

Pugh 2-A

Pugh 2-B

Pugh 2-B

Pugh 2-C

Pugh 2-C

Feasibility Analysis

How long will it take to fill up the entire tray of lip balm/hand salve containers individually?

Assumptions:

  1. Hand Salve Volume: 1.85 oz
  2. Lip Balm Volume: 0.2 oz
  3. Commercially available wax melting/pouring machine maximum: 1 gallon/min = 2.13 oz/sec
  4. System will be able to melt at 20% of commercial maximum = .426 oz/sec
  5. Setup for each dispensing = 10 sec

Total Volume Needed:

  • 250 Lip Balm containers: 50 oz
  • 50 Hand Salve containers: 92.5 oz

Total Time:

  • Lip Balm: 43 minutes
  • Hand Salve: 11.95 minutes

Conclusions:

  • Dispensing time is a large source of time and opportunity to quicken process is possible
What is the maximum allowable temperature the students should have access to?

Answered via benchmarking.

  • According to ASTM standards, 120°F after contact for 5+mins would cause 1st-2nd degree burns.
    • Allowing for fluctuations in surface temperature, and taking into consideration the age of students, a 15% error is applied.
    • 120°F x (0.85) = 102°F
  • According to pamphlet by American Burn Association, 100°F is allowable temperature for bathing children of all ages.

Conclusion:

  • Max allowable accessible temp is 100°F, anything between 100°F and 120°F should have a barrier and a visible warning, anything above 120°F should not be accessible by students.
Is a Hot Fudge dispenser a viable option?

Assumptions:

  1. Device operates on Double-boiler principle (Impossible to burn or scald product).
  2. Max Temp 210°F, adjustable via knob with accuracy of 5°F.
  3. Device is insulated, no safety concerns.
  4. Portion pump dispenses same amount each time (approx. 1 oz, adjustable with 1/8 oz increments).
  5. Hot wax/oil maintains consistency and temperature during dispensing.
  6. Hot Wax container can hold approx. 102 oz of product.

Total Volume Needed:

  • 250 Lip Balm containers: 50 oz.
  • 50 hand salve containers: 92.5 oz.

Conclusions:

  • Hot Fudge dispenser can easily dispense two batches of lip balm containers (2% leftover) or one batch of hand salve (9.3% leftover).
How can we make sure our system does not clog?
  • What does it mean for a system to clog?
    • If the heated and mixed ingredient does not flow out freely out of whatever it is we are dispensing from, we can say that the system has clogged.
  • How did the last team fail in terms of clogging?
    • They focused on this idea of bringing the heated and mixed ingredient to the packaging station where they can dispense the material through a tube and into the containers. It was a good idea, but failed to think of the tube in which the ingredients flow out from. Ingredients ended up staying in the tube and clogging it. The users had to change out the tube or clean it (which is hard to do) to use it again.
  • What were the engineering requirements related to this issue, and how can we improve upon it?
    • So basically, this hasn’t been discussed in our previous team’s engineering requirements, but I think we should work on decreasing the surface area that comes in contact with the heated ingredients
    • This means that we should work on shortening the path taken by the heated ingredient from the heating vessel to the packaging as much as possible. Best case scenario will be, according to my argument, direct dispensing from heating vessel to the container - No intermediate steps. Physically making it impossible to clog.
How can the hot-plate / soup-pot solution that P15420 started become one of our feasible solutions?

Best answered via: Prototyping

Assumptions:

  1. Product material is consistent.
  2. Hotplate set to 160F.
  3. Actual material temp 150F < X < 170F.
  4. Soup pot dimensions same as P15420’s.
  5. Hot-plate Specs same as P15420’s.

Tools to Solve the Problem:

  • Fix dispensing process:
    • Keep Material from cooling
      • Conductive Material
      • 2nd Heat Source
      • Decrease channel dispense length
    • Increase Dispense velocity
      • Increase the channel dispense diameter
      • Increase dispense pressure
        • Lower dispenser position
        • Manually pump material out of heating chamber
    • Add an actual dispenser
      • Drill, thread, install, and MIG weld a metal spigot

Conclusion:

  • It’s probably feasible with the tools above.

Risk Assessment

Risk Management

Risk Management

Design Review Materials

Plans for next phase

Phase Jason Ceresoli Jinhong Saw Autumn Smith Michael Swick Benjamin Bondor Alex Sowinski
Phase 1 (wk 1-3) Jason Jin Autumn Mike Ben Alex
Phase 2 (wk 4-6) Jason Jin Autumn Mike Ben Alex
Phase 3 (wk 7-9)
Phase 4 (wk 10-12)
Phase 5 (wk 13-15)

Home | Planning & Execution |

Problem Definition | Systems Design | Subsystem Design | Preliminary Detailed Design | Detailed Design

Build & Test Prep | Subsystem Build & Test | Integrated System Build & Test | Integrated System Build & Test with Customer Demo | Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation