P16462: Wind Energy Base Station
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Systems Design

Table of Contents

Project Plan for Phase II

Project Plan for Phase II

Project Plan for Phase II

Benchmarking

For this concept, benchmarking is difficult due to not much information released by companies. The concept is also new and very theoretical so not much information is available.
Benchmarking Table

Benchmarking Table

Functional Decomposition

Functional Decomposition

Functional Decomposition

Morphological Chart and Concept Selection

The team's first attempt at a morph chart is shown here:
Morph Table, First Version

Morph Table, First Version

However, once further steps were attempted the team decided that we did not get technical enough and needed more differentiating factors. Therefore, a new morph chart was created:

Morph Table, Second Version

Morph Table, Second Version

Concept Development

Concept Designs

Concept Designs

Design concept 1 is called The External Wired Motor; it has a base with a ring held by four columns. There is a small reel with the motor within the base that longs length and power while the actual controls are outside of the base. There is a generator within the base but all of the input for the base are off base and signal is sent through wires. The plane is tied using a two string bridle system and it has wheels for landing.

Design concept two is called Heavy Battery Motor; it has a base with a spherical bushing held by two columns. This is a heavy weight design with the DC motor separate from the base. There are batteries within the base but the motor is also powered charged. The controls are outside of the base on the motor so that the base is self standing. The plane has small hooks screwed on and then tied to a four bridle system for better control of the bank angle.

Design concept three is called Crank & Motor; it has a wooden railed onto the ground base with the reel inside of the base. 360 rotation is doable due to the similar ring assembly from design concept one. The motor is completely separate and powered by 110 AC. The plane has no launch or landing gear. It is meant to be human launched and parachute landed. The plane is attached with glue and a two point bridle system.

Design Concept four is called Pin Reel with Crank/Drum; it has a metal base with an external reel and DC motor. It has a spherical bushing with a four column structure in order to provide 360 tether rotation. The base is staked onto the ground. An operator is needed because this is a DC motor/ human powered base station. The plane has wheels for landing and launching and it is held to the plane using a four point bridle system.

Concept Selection

Pugh Chart

Pugh Chart

While making this chart, the team removed and added designs. This included a combo of the two power methods and a whole new innovative concept.

Feasibility: Prototyping, Analysis, Simulation

Click here for a copy of our Phase Appropriate Feasibility Analysis

Systems Architecture

System Architecture

System Architecture

Designs and Flowcharts

Flow Chart - Electrical

Flow Chart - Electrical

Flow Chart - Mechanical

Flow Chart - Mechanical

Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment

The risk management table was updated to reflect the different designs and new information gathered over the three weeks.

Design Review Materials

Plans for next phase

Phase III Plan

Phase III Plan

Individual Contributions
Team Member Systems Design Phase: What did I actually do? Systems Design Phase: What did I learn? Systems Design Phase: What will I contribute?
Sarah Collmus
  • Researched launch systems
  • Created numerous designs to bring to group
  • Contributed to functional decomposition, morph chart, Pugh chart
  • Researched prices of tether guider ideas
  • Laid out slideshow flow
  • Contacted aero club for pilot guide
  • Rearranged EDGE flow, added spaces for pictures
  • Formalized Pugh Chart
  • The design process is lengthy but necessary and will probably be done multiple times
  • No matter how crazy the idea, throw it down as possible anyway
  • The team needs to be on the same page with how to do each part of the design process or it will cause arguments
  • Manage more strictly quality and completion of tasks
  • Design and create proxy tether control system
  • Make decisions about design ideas and numbers
  • Work with drafter to begin first CADs drawings of base
  • Slideshow for week 9 review
Laura Arciniegas
  • Drew up wings and other components of the plane on CREO 2.0.
  • Feasibility analysis on the landing components of the glider.
  • Created the first, second, and third revisions of the Morph Chart.
  • Attended two aero meetings and started to learn XFLR5.
  • Helped with the development of base design.
  • Took notes and facilitated meetings.
  • Learned about wheel placement methods and calculations and how to apply them to our own glider.
  • The Morph Chart may not be the best method for every MSD group, since several versions did not conclude in much.
  • XFLR5 is a great method for finding wing and flight properties.
  • System designing takes whole group involvement and debating.
  • Continue to learn XFLR5 and attend more aero meetings.
  • Finish the CAD for the Glider so that stress modeling can start.
  • Help select the base design.
  • Start CAD drafting of the base.
  • Took notes and facilitated meeting.
Kevin Collins
  • Ran simulation to gather output forces and and velocities.
  • Created concepts designs that were used in the Pugh Chart.
  • Reviewed Engineering Requirements.
  • Attended RIT Aero Club.
  • Helped in designing of Functional Decomposition, Morph, and Pugh Charts.
  • Did a general feasibility analysis of whether the demands of the engineering requirements were within the capabilities of the glider.
  • Wrote up Delivery Completion Plan.
  • Established team dynamics based on teammates skill sets.
  • I learned that our system will work around limited parameters, due to the scale of the system.
  • I learned about Li-Po battery charging and discharging and maintenance.
  • Learned about the relative motion that the reel in process used to maintain flow about the foil.
  • Our project is to test and prove that this concept is feasible in itself. Small steps are required. We cannot get ahead of ourselves.
  • Process is key. If the process is not followed, we will not come to a valid conclusion or may not reach our objective.
  • A consistent work habit needs to be established to provide reliable times to work on the project.
  • Establish more communicated raports with the team.
  • Utilize available resources and authorities better, Aero Club, Glenn Gavi, Dr. Gomes, Dr. Kolodziej
Aleksandr Kim
  • Accomplished some preliminary aero analysis of the plane.
  • Consulted with the graduate student about how the simulation works and how it applies to our plane
  • Took general measurements of the plane
  • Created sketches for possible design options
  • Created the morphological table
  • General work on Phase II deliverables and preparation for system design review
  • The importance of breaking down the system and how to select feasible designs from that
  • Communication is still very important. Probably even more so now that things are getting more technical
  • Things generally take longer to do than we generally think it will
  • Practice on the RC pilot simulator to become the secondary pilot
  • Play more with the simulation and have a better understanding of how it works
  • General assistance with phase III deliverables
  • Continue assisting team with what they may need
  • Begin ordering parts as needed and track the group's financial situation and BOM
Michael Ostaszewski
  • Developed System Architecture chart.
  • Aided in developing Functional Decomposition, Morph, and Pugh Charts.
  • Researched stress effects from tether tension on plane.
  • Published work from the team on the edge website
  • Design is an iterative process (We redid several things that were not quite right the first time.
  • Distinguishing between a subsystem and the overall system can be difficult at times.
  • The final system is some sort of combination of the proposed systems.
  • Provide detailed stress analysis to show:
    1. The maximum tension the plane can withstand.
    2. How many cycles the plane can go before failing due to fatigue.
  • Continue to manage the edge website.
Kevin Larkin
  • Researched into Micro controllers if the group decided to go into a less human controlled flight.
  • Found a place to fly the plane
  • Updated Risk Management
  • Drew up circuit schematics
  • Created transfer functions that will be needed if a motor controlled base is implemented.
  • I learned that steady work is the best way to complete a large project such as this.
  • Working in large spurts is too inconsistent and doesn¢®¯t give enough time for the refining of ideas.
  • Learned about battery life, and how to properly charge the batteries for storage.
  • Learned more about the coding and selection of micro controllers.
  • Until a definite design is nailed down, don¢®¯t run too far into researching components, as this can waste time.
  • Work ethic becomes more steady instead of doing things at the last minute.
  • Finalize designs and communicate my progress to the team.
Sukmin Lee
  • Aided in developing Risk Assessment, Morph-chart.
  • Developed flowchart.
  • started to set up actual flying plan.
  • Published work from the team on the edge website.
  • System Design will not be the one time process. It will be modified on subsystem process.
  • In the beginning of the design process, it was important to READ and FOLLOW the instruction first.
  • Build and Install electrical components on Plane.
  • Design a systematic diagram of a base circuit.
  • Develop in flying plan, meeting goals test plan.
  • Research on radio signal processors.

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