P17001: Wearable Glove-Based Controller
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Detailed Design

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Detailed Design Phase

Plan

At the conclusion of the preliminary detailed design phase, the team settled on the combination of the Tappin’ Five method with mechanical switches to demonstrate typing abilities. Now that the typing method and the sensors to achieve this method have been selected, the team must decide on a final (electrical) BOM. In addition, the team will begin exploring construction options for the device as this remains one of the highest risk items for the project. By the end of this phase the team hopes to have decided on the mechanism that will trigger the switch when a finger is moved. The team also hopes to gain a better understanding of how this mechanism will connect to the fingers.

Accomplishments

During the final detailed design phase, the team updated the customer and engineering requirements as well as the functional decomposition based on feedback from past reviews as well as a meeting with the customer. A rough schematic of the electronics to be used in the device was created to the best of the team’s ability based on component decisions made up to this point. A software flow diagram was created to show how the code that runs the device will work. The BOM was updated to as close to final as possible (at this point), and the test plans were revamped. A basic hand sizing analysis was completed using the ANSUR database. A method for activating the switch was tested using 3D printed components. Multiple solidworks models were created to show how the device would look. One was created for the components on the hand, and a second was created for the components that will go in the box off of the hand. A sketch was created to show how the team may present for Imagine RIT. The team would like to try to make the setup of the table reflect a consumer device by using a modern aesthetics approach.

Progress Report

As of November 21st, the following items were updated towards the completion of detailed design:

Remaining tasks (to be completed after break):

Updated Customer Requirements

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Updated Engineering Requirements

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Drawings, Schematics, Flow Charts, Simulations

Adjustability

The following will support the adjustability engineering requirement.

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Update to Functional Decomposition

During this phase, we added many details that were not originally captured in the functional decomposition. The updated version is shown below. The four sections "Setup Device", "Send Text", "End Use of WI" and "Charge Cycle" fall under the common header of "Use WI". Functional Decomposition updated 12/12 to add in "ease of use" block.
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Electrical Schematic

The following shows the electrical schematic for the device. The switches and the diodes will be inside the box located on the back of the hand while the rest of the electronics will be inside the box located on the arm.

Since the schematics are not known for the bluetooth module evaluation board and the Teensy evaluation board they are summarized into symbols. This works well to show how the prototype will be put together, although for a final product these schematics will need to be looked into.

Schematic

Schematic

Software Flowchart

Bill of Material (BOM)

Updates (11/21/16)

Updates (12/04/16)

Updates (12/04/16)


 Bill of Materials

Bill of Materials


Click here for the working document.

Test Plans

Purpose

Demonstrate objectively the degree to which the Engineering Requirements are satisfied

Example flowchart of battery life test plan:

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The full working document can be found here.

Prototyping, Engineering Analysis, Simulation

Attachment of String to Switch

One of the obstacles we faced this phase was determining how to attach the string to the switch in order to properly activate it. After brainstorming some ideas as a team, we decided to implement an idea in Solidworks and rapid prototype it in the Construct. Within a few hours, we were able to obtain the following design:
1st iteration of Switch Activator

1st iteration of Switch Activator

1st iteration of Switch Activator with Switch

1st iteration of Switch Activator with Switch

Switches and Switch Adapter on Protoboard

Switches and Switch Adapter on Protoboard

Switches and Switch Adapter on Protoboard

Switches and Switch Adapter on Protoboard

Because this design of the switch activator was fairly wide, we had issues with the spacing of the switches to fit on the hand appropriately. We implemented a second design to eliminate the length of the design. This design is more compact and allows us to make the casing on the hand smaller.

2nd iteration of Switch Activator with Switch

2nd iteration of Switch Activator with Switch

2nd iteration of Switch Activator with Switch (shown transparently)

2nd iteration of Switch Activator with Switch (shown transparently)

CAD Prototype of Device on Hand

The following device was designed to fit the 5th percentile of female hands. This design is the "consumer-looking" device that will fit on the hand, which was decided on in the customer meeting that took place on November 28th. This design will be tested for functionality, and aesthetic components will be modified after functionality is proven. Not shown in the model is a velcro strap that will secure the device to the hand by sliding the velcro through the tabs on the side of the case.

The first iteration will be printed using the Construct. Further iterations of printing will be performed until the casing performs as desired. Final printing will be done on the highest quality printer available to the team, currently as the Brinkman lab.

Images of the design are shown below, as well as a link to a video of the model displayed in 3-D in Solidworks.

Full Device

Full Device

Full Device displayed with transparent case

Full Device displayed with transparent case

Base with no case

Base with no case

Device on reference 5th percentile women's hand

Device on reference 5th percentile women's hand

Link to Video of model displayed in 3-D: Video

Electrical Components

Based on our discussion with Willow, we decided to take all the electrical components off the hand and move them to a different location (either on the arm or on the table next to the device on the hand). The electrical components shown include the Teensy, Bluesmirf Silver Bluetooth LE module, 2.5Ah Battery, and Lipo Charger.

The casing is approximately the size of an Iphone 6. There are extrusions with holes for Velcro in case this would be strapped onto someone's forearm for demonstration. There is also a hole where wires can strung through.

Casing for Electronics

Casing for Electronics

Casing with Electronics

Casing with Electronics

Risk Assessment

Newly Identified Risks

Newly Identified Risks

Risks Still Highly Relevant

Risks Still Highly Relevant

Click here for the working document.

Design Review Materials

See meeting notes from customer meeting.

Summary of MSD I

The ultimate goal for MSD I was to deliver a comprehensive design for a wearable glove-like interface that allows users to type on-the-go with one hand. In order to do this, MSD I was split into four major phases: Problem Definition, Systems Design, Preliminary Detailed Design, and Detailed Design.

During the Problem Definition phase, use cases were identified, customer and engineering requirements were defined, constraints were established, and a risk assessment was created. The major use case identified was the glove being used to mimic typing on a qwerty keyboard. Other use cases included: controlling a presentation, controlling a robot, virtual reality applications, and the ability to control solid modelling software. The typing use case is the one the team moved forward with for the remainder of MSD I. The customer requirements were separated into six categories: convenient, comfortable, durable, functional, portable, and safe. The engineering requirements were broken up into four categories: mechanical, electrical, comfort, and availability. A house of quality was created to show the interactions between the customer requirements and the engineering requirements. A risk assessment was created in order to identify threats to the project.

During the Systems Design phase, a functional decomposition was created, benchmarking was performed, and a typing method was selected. The functional decomposition broke down the typing use case and helped bring to fruition how the device would actually work. Benchmarking was performed against three glove-like typing devices: the Gest, Keyglove, and Tap Strap; as well as two cellular phones: the LG G3, and the Motorola Razr V3. The typing method that was selected by the team was the “Tappin’ Five” which was inspired by the tap strap’s typing scheme. This typing method uses combinations of fingers tapped at once to create unique characters.

During the Preliminary Detailed Design phase, the main focus was the selection of the switches that would be used to execute the Tappin’ Five typing method. Accelerometers, hall effect sensors, switches, and flex sensors were all explored and tested during this phase. The sensors were evaluated based on a number of selection criteria which included: durability, signal quality, time to set up, external electronics, program difficulty, signal processing, size of device, cost, and tactile feedback. Ultimately, it was decided that the switches were the best fit for the design due to the simple nature of the required programming and the ability for the switches to be mounted on the back of the hand.

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Plans for next phase

Individual Plans for First 3 Weeks of MSD II

Team Member
Carolyn's Plans
Emmanuel's Plans
Arshia's Plans
Nicole's Plans
Nick's Plans
Jackie's Plans

Team Plans for MSD II

Electrical:

Testing:

Mechanical:

Deliverables:

Reviews:

Gantt Chart

 Plan for MSD II


Click here for the working document.

Imagine RIT

 Imagine RIT Initial Concept

Imagine RIT Initial Concept

The current list of needs for Imagine RIT are:

 Example of Exploded View

Example of Exploded View

 Example of a profile view

Example of a profile view

 Hand Tutorial (Concept)

Hand Tutorial (Concept)

Gate Review Materials

Click here for Phase 1 Shared Vision Document

Click here for Overall Team Vision for MSD II

Click here for Team Critique of MSD I

Click here for MSD II Test Plans

Click here for Action Items from Detailed Design Review

Click here for working document of Problem Tracking.

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Click here for working document of MSD II Schedule


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