P17062: Keller's Kats Cart
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Systems Design

Table of Contents

Team Vision for System-Level Design Phase

Functional Decomposition

The Functional Decomposition identifies the functional components of the engineering requirements. Through the identification of these components it is possible to improve development of the subsystem and make sure that it meets the requirements set forth in the engineering requirements.

 Decomposition describing the breakdown of functions the product serves

Decomposition describing the breakdown of functions the product serves

Benchmarking

Benchmarking enables the design team to establish a baseline for possible concepts by comparing to existing products. Possible trade offs in design can be determined through this technique and needs that are not being fulfilled by existing products can be identified. Currently, there is no commercially available mobility assisting devices for cats, so therefore dog carts were used to develop a baseline. It is important to note that while benchmarking does help to establish a greater understanding of design requirements, a dog is distinctly different from a cat in terms of engineering and ergonomic requirements.

Benchmarking Table compares existing products relevant to the design

Benchmarking Table compares existing products relevant to the design

Benchmarking Table

Morphological Chart

The Morphological Chart details possible designs and concepts for each function of the product in question. The idea is to then discuss the relative merits and issues with each concept and combine them in the most mutually beneficial combination to produce the best overall concept.

The Morphological chart allows for the examination of possible subsystem designs

The Morphological chart allows for the examination of possible subsystem designs

Selection Criteria

The Selection Criteria outlines the desired features that must be taken into consideration when examining possible subsystem designs. In addition, these features were considered for their feasibility to meet the needs of both Trey and Delilah. This was done to enable the development of a single prototype that meets the basic needs for both cats and to help determine the specific characteristics unique to each Trey and Delilah. Physical prototype testing will be necessary to determine with certainty what features and designs are best suited to both Trey and Delilah.

  • Durability
  • Toxicity
  • Budget
  • Weight
  • Maximizes mobility
  • Maximizes freedom of motion
  • Complexity
  • Conforms to cat's personality
  • Minimizes human interaction
  • Ease of assembly
  • Ease of use
  • Adjustable

System Architecture

A top-down overview of how each component of the cat cart relates to the other components.
 System architecture for the cat cart

System architecture for the cat cart

Risk Assessment

An overview of all of the potential places that design risk could occur. This ranges anywhere from technical issues such as too much weight in the design to safety issues such as sharp edges and a design that can make the cat get stuck in the environment.

 Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment

Risk Assessment.docx

Feasibility Analysis

Conceptual Constraints and Materials:

For analysis of a simple build, the following components will be utilized for each system:

 Feasibility Analysis

Feasibility Analysis

Feasibility Anaylsis

Based on the calculations, the cost and total mass for the cart components remain well within an acceptable range, with plenty of overhead for connectors and other necessary components.

Arrows would only require a hand-saw, and assorted connectors may only require glue and a few screwdrivers or wrenches.

Product Concept Art

 One of two final concept sketches

One of two final concept sketches

 Two of two final concept sketches

Two of two final concept sketches

Test Planning

Current schedule for the next three weeks of design. This upcoming phase will involve physical prototype creation and development. Ideas that have been brainstormed during this phase will be rigorously tested to make sure they can meet the engineering requirements.

 Testing plan for initial prototyping

Testing plan for initial prototyping

Individual contributions were created using the Three Week Plan. These documents are proprietary but a copy can be given if requested. Questions we answered were 1) what do I plan to do to ensure a successful Phase 2 Review 2) what did I actually do in Phase 2 3) what did I learn in Phase 2


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