P17105: HABIP-DAQC
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Integrated System Build & Test with Customer Demo

Table of Contents

Team Vision for System Level Demo with Customer

During this phase the team desired to complete the entire platform and execute the launch. Below are the plans that the team had for this phase:



For this phase, the team actually accomplished:

Launch Day

On April 29, 2017, we had an actual launch of the platform:
The Team

The Team

The Full Launch Team

The Full Launch Team

At 11:45am on April 29th, 2017, the platform had lift off, it traveled up to around 83,000 ft. altitude and then landed near Syracuse and was recovered by 4:30pm.
Flight Path

Flight Path





Here is the Launch Video.

Here is the timelapse of the entire flight.

Here is an hour of launch day and flight footage.



Recovered!

Recovered!

Pi Hats

The first HAB launch flew with four PiHAT boards. Each board was configured to store photos/video as log sensor data as detailed in the following table.
PiHAT Configurations

PiHAT Configurations

During pre-launch checks, it was determined that PiHATs B2 and B3 were not powering on. There was no time to debug the issues, so the mission proceeded with PiHATs B0 and B1 properly working. Post launch, it was determined that the two UART cables connected to B2 and B3 were not wired correctly. The UART Host Tx was tied to the RST input on the PiHAT and therefore disabled the PiHAT’s power supply, keeping B2 and B3 powered off. No data was recovered from either of the two boards. Also, a plastic lens cover was placed on the bottom camera of B0 to protect during HAB pre-launch checks. This cover was not removed before launch and thus the camera pictures and videos were tinted.

PiHAT B0 I2C and 1-Wire data was successfully logged. PiHAT B1 was the only completely functioning board. Post-processing the sensor data showed that the maximum mission altitude achieved was between 82416ft and 78396ft. External HAB temperatures were measured down to -58F. The mission ascent time was approximately 63 minutes. The calculated ascent rate using the maximum altitude was ~1275ft/min. The mission descent time was approximately 25 minutes, with a calculated descent rate of ~3175ft/min. The two below plots document the recorded data through the mission. Following the plots in an image of Earth and space captured by PiHAT B1.

PiHAT B0 Mission Data

PiHAT B0 Mission Data

PiHAT B1 Mission Data

PiHAT B1 Mission Data

PiHAT B1 Earth and Space Photo

PiHAT B1 Earth and Space Photo

Host Board / Reaction Wheel

For the first HAB launch, only the critical functionality was implemented for the DAQCS Host board due to time constraints and the large number of features that could be implemented. On the Host MSP430FR5994 micro-controller, the UART communication between all of the Raspberry Pi Sensor Nodes, SPI communication between the Host and the COMMS Raspberry Pi Board, cutdown mechanism control, reaction wheel battery voltage sensing and simple GPIO based control of the Motor MSP430FR5994. On a software level, SPI communication between the two MSP430FR5994s was also completed but due to some bugs, the functionality was decided to be removed from the final launch platform. Regardless, the Host MSP430FR5994 was able to receive all commands from the COMMS board and either send commands to the Motor MSP430FR5994 or forward commands to a particular Raspberry Pi Sensor Node. The Host would then be able to store local copies of all incoming data from both the Raspberry Pi sensor nodes and the Motor MSP430FR5994. This data would then be sent to COMMS for transmission back to earth.

On the Motor MSP430FR5994, only limited functionality was implemented due to timing constraints and to optimized the reaction wheel control algorithm. All data from the IMU was able to be acquired over a SPI interface. An analog signal from the reaction wheel motor controller was able to be acquired and converted to received the actual speed of the motor over time. Using the built in Real-Time clock unit, all data collected was able to be timestamped down to millisecond accuracy and up to hour accuracy. The read/write speeds of data to the SD card limited the overall speed of the reaction wheel control algorithm when constantly acquiring and storing data to the SD card. In order to compensate for the slow write speeds, built in FRAM was utilized to quickly save over 2 minutes of data collection while the reaction wheel is being used. This allowed the reaction wheel controller to operate at approximately 200Hz. After 2 minutes of running the controller, the controller would be disabled and the data in FRAM would be dumped to a single text file on the SD card. When the motor controller was not operating, data would continue to be logged to the SD card approximately every 100ms, and would log data for 5 minutes at a time. Finally, using all of this data, PWM signals were generated to control the speed and direction of the motor through the motor controller. The final assembled DAQCS board can be seen below.

Fully Assembled DAQCS Host Board

Fully Assembled DAQCS Host Board


DAQCS MSP430 FIRMWARE : Download Here

Reaction Wheel Data

Reaction Wheel Data


The above plot shows the final test data of the reaction wheel and the instrumentation platform. It can be seen that the approximated 1:170 proportion between the platform and the reaction wheel was proven to be correct. However, unlike what was first thought, the controller ended up becoming a proportional-integral controller, rather than a proportional one. This left two gains to be determined; they were found through testing to be equal to approximately 120 and -0.2 for the Kp and Ki, respectively. It can be seen that after being implemented, the platform maintained its zero RPM angular velocity relatively well, with a steady state being reached within approximately 0.5 second. There was some oscillation around the zero point, which was mitigated by filtering the IMU with an exponential moving average. A boundary was then set at +/-0.2 RPM to further try to mitigate the “bouncing” of the IMU data.

Here is a video of the reaction wheel rotating the final HAB platform during pre-launch checks.

GRSS

Here is the video of the GRSS working installed in the platform. The GRSS was useful in recovering the platform due to the worker in the treatment plant hearing it and being curious. The GRSS lasted the entire flight and still has plenty of battery left over.

Risk and Problem Tracking

Plans for next phase

Chris Schwab's Plan: Chris's Goals

Lincoln Glauser's Plan: Lincoln's Goals

Steven Giewont's Plan: Steven's Goals

Sydney Kaminski's Plan: Sydney's Goals


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