P17431: St. Joseph's House Shelter Improvements
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Integrated System Build & Test

Table of Contents
MSD I & II MSD I MSD II

Home

Project Photos and Videos

Imagine RIT

Team Member Roles Definition

Meeting Minutes

Phase 1: Problem Definition

Phase 2: Systems Design

Phase 3: Preliminary Detailed Design

Phase 4: Detailed Design

Phase 1: Platform Lift Design

Phase 2: Systems Re-Design

Phase 3: Detailed Re-Design

Phase 4: Integrated System Build & Test

Phase 5: Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation

Complete Design Documentation

Drawing Package

All drawings for the hospitality room cabinet can be found here.

All drawings for the dining room cabinet can be found here.

All drawings for the storage carts (both large and small) can be found here.

Bill of Materials

The final bills of materials for the cabinets and carts are shown below. The live document can be found here (Microsoft Excel .xlsx format).
The final bill of materials for the cabinets.

The final bill of materials for the cabinets.

The final bill of materials for the carts.

The final bill of materials for the carts.

Assembly Manual

The assembly manual for the hospitality room cabinet, dining room cabinet, small storage cart, and large storage cart can be found here. As of May 1, 2017, only the cart assembly manuals have been completed. The assembly manuals for the cabinets will follow soon.

Build Documentation

Cart Builds

Brinkman lab - Preparing and Cutting Carts Parts

Once the parts for the carts arrived, the team went down to the Brinkman lab in order to cut the parts to the correct dimensions and prepare each part. The metal "L" bars were first sanded down to remove any residue. Then it was wiped down to get rid of the dust from sanding. Later, the "L" bars were cut to fit the width and length of the cart using a bandsaw. (Shown in Figure 1.)
Figure 1: Cutting

Figure 1: Cutting "L" bars on the bandsaw.

Then holes were drilled into the bottom surface for the screws to go through. (Shown in Figures 2 and 3)

Figure 2: Ezra drilling holes on the Bridgeport milling machine.

Figure 2: Ezra drilling holes on the Bridgeport milling machine.

Figure 3: Connor drilling holes on the Bridgeport milling machine.

Figure 3: Connor drilling holes on the Bridgeport milling machine.

For the plywood, the panel saw in the wood shop was used to cut the wood to be 15.5" x 21". (Shown in Figure 4). Later, the parts for the double cart were also prepared and cut in the exact same manner.

Figure 4: Cutting cart base panel to size.

Figure 4: Cutting cart base panel to size.

MSD Area - First Prototype Cart Assembly

After the plywood and the metal "L" bars were cut to the correct dimensions, the "L" bars were attached to the plywood with screws using a drill. (Shown in Figure 5)
Figure 5: Installed

Figure 5: Installed "L" bars.

Then the plywood was flipped over and the casters were attached with screws using a drill and #6 X 5/8" wood screws. (Shown in Figure 6)

Figure 6: Attached casters.

Figure 6: Attached casters.

The completed cart is shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7: Completed single-stack cart.

Figure 7: Completed single-stack cart.

St. Joseph's - Double Cart Assembly

First the steel "L" bars were added to the cart. The dimensions the bars were placed were exactly the same as the small cart. A spacing in between the two areas was added in order to accommodate the slanting of the totes. (Shown in Figure 8)
Figure 8:

Figure 8: "L" bars attached to the double-stack cart.

Then the casters were added. Two swivels are on one side of the board and two rigid are on the other side. The rigid casters were attached using a screw and nut which the swivels were just screwed directly on. (shown in figure 9)

Figure 9: Attaching the casters.

Figure 9: Attaching the casters.

The completed double-stack cart is shown in Figure 10.

Figure 10: Completed double-stack cart.

Figure 10: Completed double-stack cart.

Cabinet Builds

Home Depot - Purchasing parts

On April 4, 2017, the team went to Home Depot to purchase the plywood and lumber for the cabinet. The total purchase (including online orders) was about $1300.00 with a total weight of about 1000 lbs. Figures 11 and 12 show the lumber and plywood that was purchased.
Figure 11: One cart of plywood.

Figure 11: One cart of plywood.

Figure 12: A second cart of plywood plus lumber.

Figure 12: A second cart of plywood plus lumber.

The plywood and some of the lumber were too large to fit in our cars, so the bulk of the order remained at Home Depot. On Thursday, April 6, we returned for the plywood and the long two-by-fours with a rented U-Haul pickup truck. It was a rainy day, but a tarp purchased from U-Haul kept the wood largely dry until we were able to unload it into the RIT machine shop.

RIT Machine Shop - Building Piece Parts

On Tuesday, April 11, we began the task of cutting the plywood and lumber to the desired sizes. We began by marking the complex-shaped plywood pieces, as shown in Figure 13.
Figure 13: Marking complex-shaped plywood parts.

Figure 13: Marking complex-shaped plywood parts.

Throughout the following week, we met regularly to cut out plywood parts using the panel saw in the RIT wood shop, as shown in Figure 14. Figure 15 shows a panorama of the sometimes-crowded nature of working in the wood shop.

Figure 14: Cutting a cabinet panel on the panel saw.

Figure 14: Cutting a cabinet panel on the panel saw.

Figure 15: Finding room for four people to navigate around the stack of plywood was frequently a challenge.

Figure 15: Finding room for four people to navigate around the stack of plywood was frequently a challenge.

In addition to cutting the plywood panels, we also met to cut two-by-fours to the design lengths using the miter saw. The miter saw enabled us to easily cut the angles needed for the hospitality room cabinet.

Shifting Base of Operations from RIT to St. Joseph's

On Tuesday, April 18, we shifted our base of operations from the RIT senior design space to the hospitality room at St. Joseph's. Sam Huselstein assisted with the move, driving one of St. Joseph's vans to RIT. There, we loaded the plywood, lumber, and hardware into the van. We met Sam at St. Joseph's and immediately began unloading the supplies. Since St. Joseph's was closed for the week of April 17-21, we were able to spread our supplied out in the hospitality room.

Once all the supplies had been unloaded, then first order of business was to varnish the cabinet panels, since nearly all the assembly required the panels to be finished and dried. We borrowed two tarps from St. Joseph's to use as drop cloths, as well as a brush, roller, and roller pan. We laid out several panels, and got right to work. We were instantly impressed with the results, as the polyurethane brought out the grain of the red oak plywood. Figure 16 shows the varnished panels arranged on the floor of the hospitality room. Figure 17 shows how the varnish brought the beauty of the red oak to life.

Figure 16: Cabinet panels arranged on the floor of the hospitality room, in varying stages of the finishing process.

Figure 16: Cabinet panels arranged on the floor of the hospitality room, in varying stages of the finishing process.

Figure 17: The polyurethane accentuated the grain of the red oak plywood.

Figure 17: The polyurethane accentuated the grain of the red oak plywood.

St. Joseph's - Dining Room Cabinet

Assembly of the dining room cabinet began the same day as varnishing the panels. We first assembled the rectangular frame that makes up the base of the dining room cabinet, as shown in Figure 18.
Figure 18: The first step of assembling the dining room cabinet: constructing the base of the frame.

Figure 18: The first step of assembling the dining room cabinet: constructing the base of the frame.

On Thursday, April 20, we followed by assembling the top of the dining room cabinet frame. The next step was to attach the floor of the cabinet to the base frame, as shown in Figure 19. Aligning the base frame to all four sides of the floor helped to square the base frame.

Figure 19: Attaching the floor of the dining room cabinet.

Figure 19: Attaching the floor of the dining room cabinet.

Then we turned the cabinet on its side, to simplify the assembly of the upright beams of the frame. This allowed us to place the upright beam flat on the floor, align it with the base, and secure it with screws. We repeated this for the adjacent beam, then attached both of those beams to the top frame, as shown in Figure 20.

Figure 20: Attaching the uprights of the dining room cabinet.

Figure 20: Attaching the uprights of the dining room cabinet.

After these two beams had been secured, we rotated the assembly by 180 degrees, so that its opposite side rested on the ground. Then we repeated the previous steps to attach the other two upright beams. Having completed the assembly of the frame, we stood the cabinet up and moved it onto the window ledge. We attached the back panel of the cabinet in the upright position, as shown in Figure 21.

Figure 21: The dining room cabinet with back panel attached.

Figure 21: The dining room cabinet with back panel attached.

We began to install one of the side panels when we realized that the process would be much simpler if the cabinet were again laying on its side. We laid the cabinet back down, and attached the side panel. We found that laying the cabinet down made it easier to press the side panels against the frame, enabling us to get a tight fit between the panel and the frame. We also discovered that it was easier to square the frame when the cabinet was on its side. This process required one team member to climb inside the cabinet while another team member drilled the screws from the outside, as shown in Figure 22.

Figure 22: Attaching the side panels of the dining room cabinet.

Figure 22: Attaching the side panels of the dining room cabinet.

Once the side panels of the dining room cabinet had again been attached, we stood it back up (a much harder task to accomplish this time) and moved it back to the window ledge of the dining room. Then the door for the Kitchen Room cabinet was made. This was completed by laying the beams for the frames on the floor and screwing the parts together, as shown in Figure 23 below.

Figure 23: Kitchen room cabinet door frame.

Figure 23: Kitchen room cabinet door frame.

The plywood for the Kitchen Room cabinet was then placed on top of the frame and was screwed down onto the frame as shown in Figure 24.

Figure 24: Kitchen room cabinet door frame.

Figure 24: Kitchen room cabinet door frame.

Then the door was attached to the side of the plywood of the side panel and the frame beam of the door by using three hinges with 6 screws each as shown in Figures 25 and 26.

Figure 25: Hinge for the kitchen cabinet.

Figure 25: Hinge for the kitchen cabinet.

Figure 26: Hinges attaching the door to the kitchen cabinet.

Figure 26: Hinges attaching the door to the kitchen cabinet.

In the inside of the cabinet, there were 6 hooks attached onto the beam frame for the bungee support using 4 screws each for both vertical cabinets. This is shown in Figure 27.

Figure 27: Hooks with bungee cords for support

Figure 27: Hooks with bungee cords for support

Hospitality Cabinet

Assembly of the hospitality room cabinet followed assembly of the dining room cabinet, beginning on the 21st of April. We quickly realized that some modifications of the cabinet were in order. First, we discovered that our measurements of the hospitality room were slightly off, and that the "cut-out", designed to fit around a protrusion from south wall of the hospitality room. We elected to removed the cut-out entirely, by cutting a few inches off the end of the cabinet. This required modification of the top and bottom panels of the cabinet, as well as the fabrication of a new end panel for the cabinet. It also made three small panels in the "cut-out" obsolete.

We first assembled the top frame of the tall portion of the cabinet, shown in Figure 28.

Figure 28: Top frame of the hospitality room cabinet.

Figure 28: Top frame of the hospitality room cabinet.

This was followed by attaching the vertical beams of tall section of the cabinet (see Figure 29).

Figure 29: Assembling the upright beams of the hospitality room cabinet.

Figure 29: Assembling the upright beams of the hospitality room cabinet.

After we had assembled the tall frame of the cabinet, we placed it in its designated position. This caused us to discover a second small issue: an electrical outlet on the wall that we had failed to account for. The frame, placed (as designed) in the extreme corner next to the door, prevented use of the outlet. However, the removal of the cut-out was in our favor. The cabinet was now a few inches shorter, allowing us to reposition the entire cabinet, shifting it away from the outlet. Figure 30 shows the test alignment of the tall frame.

Figure 30: The tall frame of the hospitality room cabinet.

Figure 30: The tall frame of the hospitality room cabinet.

The next step was to attach the rear and side panels to the tall frame, as shown in Figure 31.

Figure 31: Attaching side panels to the tall hospitality room cabinet.

Figure 31: Attaching side panels to the tall hospitality room cabinet.

Once we had completed this step, we pushed the tall cabinet into the corner, aligning it with the edge of the base panels. We attached it to the base panel by drilling screws through the front and rear two-by fours on the base of the cabinet. Our next step was to attach the top of the cabinet. As we began this step, we realized that it should have preceded the attachment of the cabinet to the base. Since the corner of the cabinet was in the corner of the room, and the assembly too heavy to move, it was difficult to reach some of the screw locations which held the top to the tall cabinet. However, with some difficulty, we were able to attach the top of the tall cabinet, as shown in Figure 32.

Figure 32: Attaching the top panel to the tall hospitality room cabinet.

Figure 32: Attaching the top panel to the tall hospitality room cabinet.

We then turned our attention to the bench portion of the hospitality room cabinet. We first assembled the top frame of the bench, using the long beams and the cross beams. Then, with the top frame resting on an array of chairs, we attached the legs of the bench. When attaching the legs of the bench, we omitted the three legs which were adjacent to the tall portion of the cabinet. We decided that it would be easiest to install those three legs after the bench frame had been positioned next to the tall portion of the cabinet. We then attached the rear panels to the bench, which left the frame assembly in the state shown in Figure 33. As with the dining room cabinet, attaching panels to the frame enabled us to square the frame.

Figure 33: The bench frame of the hospitality room cabinet, with rear panels attached.

Figure 33: The bench frame of the hospitality room cabinet, with rear panels attached.

Once the new end panel for the bench had been cut, we attached it to end of the bench portion of the cabinet. Once this step was complete, we placed the bench frame in position on the base panels, since we no longer needed to access the rear and side of the bench. We then attached the bench frame to the tall portion of the cabinet, including the three legs omitted earlier. Once that attachment was complete, we attached the rest of the legs to the base panels, and began filling all joints in the cabinet with caulk, as shown in Figure 34.

Figure 34: Caulking the cabinet bench frame.

Figure 34: Caulking the cabinet bench frame.

Once the frame was completed, the front door was attached. A dremel was used to cut into the plywood to fit the hinge underneath the plywood so that there would be no gap between the door. The hinges were then screwed onto the plywood door and the beam frame. As shown in Figures 35 and 36 for the horizontal mattress storage and the additional storage area doors.

Figure 35: Door attached for the horizontal mattress storage part.

Figure 35: Door attached for the horizontal mattress storage part.

Figure 36: Door attached for the horizontal additional storage part.

Figure 36: Door attached for the horizontal additional storage part.

Once the doors were attached, door handles were attached using the dremel and drill to create a whol for the door knob to enter. A piece of wood was attached to the other side to hold the door knob in place, as shown in Figure 37 and 38.

Figure 37: The door knob attached to the outside.

Figure 37: The door knob attached to the outside.

Figure 38: The piece of wood holding the door knob door latch.

Figure 38: The piece of wood holding the door knob door latch.

Then the dremel was used to create a hole for the door plate to sit on and was screwed in place, as shown in Figure 39.

Figure 39: The door plate.

Figure 39: The door plate.

Then weatherstrip was added to the door for all the cabinet openings, as shown in Figure 40.

Figure 40: Ezra attaching the weatherstrip around the door frame.

Figure 40: Ezra attaching the weatherstrip around the door frame.

Then caulk was added to the top of the frame so that it can seal the cracks once the top plywood was placed. (Shown in Figure 41)

Figure 41: Connor applying caulk on the top of the frame.

Figure 41: Connor applying caulk on the top of the frame.

Then the top plywood boards were placed on top and screwed in place. The completed horizontal cabinet is shown in Figure 42.

Figure 42: Connor applying caulk on the top of the frame.

Figure 42: Connor applying caulk on the top of the frame.

Testing

The following tests have been completed:

Performance vs. Engineering Requirements

The table below summarizes the results of tests as of 5/4/2017, showing performance relative to engineering requirements.
Summary of system performance with respect to engineering requirements, for tests conducted to date.

Summary of system performance with respect to engineering requirements, for tests conducted to date.

Risk Assessment

For the risk assessment had two new risks added. The first risk is related to the building of the cart and cabinet, but mostly for the cabinet which is the risk of cutting the wood to the incorrect dimensions. This can cause a delay in building the cabinet and will affect the remaining budget. This can only happen because of human error, so to reduce the risk, a triple check system can be implemented. The second risk added is related to the implementation of the carts, which is the risk of incorrectly leveling out the floor in the closet. If the levelling is not even, there can be a delay in the storage cart implementation. In order to reduce the risk, a leveling tool will have to be used to constantly check the level when the closet is being renovated. The updated risk assessment is shown below (click for an enlarged image). The live document can be found here.
Updated assessment of project risks.

Updated assessment of project risks.

Problem Tracker

For the problem tracker, a few problems arose with the CAD design for the cabinets. The first problem is related to the plywood that would be used for the kitchen door. The plywood did not initially fit for the door of the kitchen, so there needed to be two pieces. However, after re-dimensioning the door, only one plywood could be used for the design. The second problem is related to the kitchen cabinet design overall. The cost of the kitchen cabinet and the hospitality cabinet were about the same, which seemed odd to the team as the kitchen cabinet is much smaller. This was due to the odd shaping of the cabinet. After looking at the overall design, small changes were made to shift plywood around so that the total amount of plywood purchased would be reduced. The last problem that arose was during the preparation of the plywood cutting. The dimensions on the CAD model was more specific than the dimensions that the team assumed could be cut at. So, several team members went through the CAD files for each part and rounded the values so that all the pieces would fit. The updated problem tracker is shown below (click for enlarged image). The live document can be found here.
Updated assessment of project risks.

Updated assessment of project risks.

Draft of Technical Paper

A draft of the final technical paper for the project can be found here.

Next phase plans

Team

The team plan for the final phase of MSD is shown below.

Individual

The individual plans for each team member can be found here

Close out Questions

The team members' self-review of work done during Phase 4 can be found here.