P17431: St. Joseph's House Shelter Improvements
/public/

Preliminary Detailed Design

Table of Contents
MSD I & II MSD I MSD II

Home

Project Photos and Videos

Imagine RIT

Team Member Roles Definition

Meeting Minutes

Phase 1: Problem Definition

Phase 2: Systems Design

Phase 3: Preliminary Detailed Design

Phase 4: Detailed Design

Phase 1: Platform Lift Design

Phase 2: Systems Re-Design

Phase 3: Detailed Re-Design

Phase 4: Integrated System Build & Test

Phase 5: Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation

Review of Team Vision for Preliminary Detailed Design Phase

Below is the team vision for the Preliminary Detailed Design Phase, showing the completion status of each task planned for this phase.
The team vision for Phase III, created at the end of Phase II. The completion status of each task is shown.

The team vision for Phase III, created at the end of Phase II. The completion status of each task is shown.

As the team vision above shows, a large number of tasks that were originally planned for this phase were not completed. We struggled to identify a mutually convenient time to meet with the staff of St. Joseph's to discuss the systems-level concepts that were generated. As a result, final selection of a systems-level concept was delayed by two weeks.

When our meeting did finally take place, our concepts were greeted with mixed reactions. It was decided that our 'cart' concept for storage of guests' personal belongings was viable, but that our concepts for storing sleeping materials were undesirable because they take up valuable floor space. We had to go back to the systems-level drawing board. Thus, our original vision for a "preliminary detailed design" phase morphed into a second-iteration of the "systems level design" phase.

Relevant Documents

Below is a list of links to the "live" documents created or updated during Phase III of the project. Screenshots of these documents are shown throughout this page.

The following links are to "live" documents that establish the team's project plan for Phase IV:

Updated Engineering Requirements

As part of our test planning, an assessment of the engineering requirements was conducted. We reviewed each requirement and discussed how a test would have to be structured in order to verify that the requirement was fulfilled. Changes to the engineering requirements are as follows:
ER1
Removed. This requirement would be impossible to test with our time constraints, and lifespan of the sleeping materials is a low priority for St. Joseph's.
ER5
Edited. This purpose of this requirement is to ensure that the whatever system is developed does not interfere with the hospitality and meal services provided by St. Joseph's. Previously, this requirement read "Number of guests who can be accommodated for hospitality". In that formulation, the requirement is difficult to test. The new wording (see below) ensures that the system does not usurp an excessive amount of floor space, thereby enabling hospitality and meals to continue relatively undisturbed. We will need to have more conversations with the customer and do more research to establish a marginal value.
ER7
Removed. This requirement is impossible (and undesirable, since we'd rather not deal with bed bugs!) to test.
ER10
Edited. The purpose of this requirement is to ensure that guests/staff do not have to lift mattresses above a comfortable height (for example: waist height). Previously, this requirement read "Altitude of sleeping material storage location above ground level". As written, this requirement would have prevented storage methods that hang from the ceiling of the hospitality room, so the wording of this requirement was changed to more accurately reflect the intent of the requirement.
ER11
Removed. This requirement was redundant because of ER 17.
ER15, ER16
Removed. These requirements do not address functionality that can be delivered by our system, and are therefore beyond the scope of our project.
ER17
Edited. This requirement was reworded to capture the intent of ER11.
ER18
Added to ensure that the personal belongings storage system is designed with adequate strength to support all the guests' belongings.
ER19
Added to ensure that any hanging systems for storing the sleeping materials will give adequate "head room" for the people in the hospitality room.

The updated engineering requirements table is shown below. The live document can be found here (Microsoft Excel .xlsx file).

Engineering requirements after Phase III updates.

Engineering requirements after Phase III updates.

Updated Functional Decomposition

The functional decomposition that was created in Phase II was fundamentally flawed, and so it was updated in Phase III. The previous version was written in terms of actions that needed to be performed by the staff of St. Joseph's, but it should have been written in terms of functions that our system must deliver. The updated version (shown below) has been written in terms of functions that our system must deliver, and focuses on the "provide shelter" branch of the original functional decomposition.
The updated functional decomposition.

The updated functional decomposition.

Systems Level Concepts Review with St. Joseph's

We met with the staff of St. Joseph's to review our concepts and obtain feedback. The key points of discussion are summarized below.

Notes from the Meeting

When
October 31, 2016 @ 10:30AM
Where
St. Joseph's second floor
Who attended :

Update on the current progress and feedback

Updated Selection Criteria

After our meeting with St. Joseph's, a further look at the sleeping arrangements required an updated selection criteria list. In order to simultaneously assess the new sleeping arrangement concepts and the previous concepts, selection criteria were updated based on the customer needs in order to ensure that the concepts would meet the customer requirements. Below is the updated list of the selection criteria.
Selection Criteria Customer Needs
Durable SA4
Lower effort to clean up/ set up SA6
User (guest/staff) safety SA6/S4/S6
Space (Floor footprint) efficiency SA2
Comfort/ergonomics SA7
Cleanliness SA8/SA10

The selection criteria related to storage were removed as the customer was content with the storage options suggested. However, as there was a need to further delve into the sleeping arrangement designs, the selection criteria in the table above are to be considered the needs for the new sleeping arrangement concepts. The concepts were used for the Pugh's Selection Method.

Benchmarking

Hand Winch

Power Winch

Cargo Nets

Cell Phone Sleeve

Who?/Where? Garage

Construction

Boat Lift

Garage

Construction

Boat Lift

Car

Shipping

Garage

Beach

Pool

Hiking

What? Metal Frame and Gears

Plastic Handle

Metal Gears

Plastic Frame

Rope

Parachute Cord

Plastic

String

Why? Cheap

Easy to Use

Durable

Little Effort to Use

Durable

Durable

Simple

Protective

Durable

Price? $20-60 $75-500 $20-100 $10

Updated Morphological Table

After the Phase II gate review, the team reiterated through the morphological chart in order to include more concepts for the morph key "allow easier access to material," in order to introduce new ideas that were generated throughout Phase III. The main ideas generated were mostly related to aerial storage for the sleeping material, which included the pulley, winch, and crane ideas. These were further looked into to broaden our scope to ensure that all concepts were not dismissed half heartedly. 2D sketches were drawn for ideas regarding these new function concepts. The updated morphological table is shown below.
The updated morphological table. Note that the table now includes more concepts for aerial storage as well as concepts for protecting the sleeping material.

The updated morphological table. Note that the table now includes more concepts for aerial storage as well as concepts for protecting the sleeping material.

Concept Sketches

Per the feedback we received from St. Joseph's, we developed concepts for suspending the sleeping materials from the ceiling of the hospitality room. The concepts we developed included:

Sketches of the concepts are shown below.

Concepts for suspending the sleeping materials from the ceiling and/or walls of the hospitality room. Left:

Concepts for suspending the sleeping materials from the ceiling and/or walls of the hospitality room. Left: "sleeve" used for suspending mattresses along the walls of the hospitality room. Second from left: cargo nets for suspending sleeping materials from the ceiling. Bottom right: "platform" for suspending sleeping materials from the ceiling. Middle right: depiction of cargo nets hanging from the hospitality room ceiling. Top right: mattresses will be stacked six or seven high on the platform or in the cargo nets.

Depiction of the single-platform lift installed in the hospitality room.

Depiction of the single-platform lift installed in the hospitality room.

Pugh's Analysis (Including Aerial Concepts)

The second iteration of the Pugh's Method analysis, which focused on storage of sleeping materials and included aerial storage concepts.

The second iteration of the Pugh's Method analysis, which focused on storage of sleeping materials and included aerial storage concepts.

Small-Scale Prototyping

A small-scale model (1inch = 2feet) of the hospitality room was constructed. Small-scale models of the single-platform lift and the cabinet benches were constructed to investigate the space usage of those concepts.
Photo of the small-scale models that were constructed. Note: the cabinet benches and the platform lift are separate concepts which are not designed to be implemented together. They are shown together here for a comparison of scale.

Photo of the small-scale models that were constructed. Note: the cabinet benches and the platform lift are separate concepts which are not designed to be implemented together. They are shown together here for a comparison of scale.

Photo of the smalle-scale model of the single-platform lift.

Photo of the smalle-scale model of the single-platform lift.

Feasibility Analysis

Plans for feasibility analyses were developed, so that once a concept has been selected we can analyze critical aspects of the design. The documents outlining the analyses to be conducted are linked below. All documents are Microsoft Word .docx format.

Test Plans

Plans were developed to test the system's performance relative to each engineering requirement. The plans are formatted as test reports, with the plan comprising the Set-Up and Procedure sections of each report. This format will enable us to save time in MSD II when the tests are performed. The test plans are only preliminary at this stage, and will be updated to be more detailed and specific once a systems-level concept has been selected.

Links to each test plan are included below with a short description of each test: (all test plans are in Microsoft Word .docx format)

Risk Assessment

The risk assessment document was updated with new risks that came up during Phase 3. The four risks that were added were hospitality space utilization, insufficient data, difficult data collection, and test plans errors. Of these additional risks, the ones to worry about the most were the data related risks. In order to mitigate these risks, the team will have to carefully plan how data will be collected and schedule in advance when and what data will be collected.
The updated risk assessment. Risks added in Phase III are identified with yellow highlighting in the 'ID' column.

The updated risk assessment. Risks added in Phase III are identified with yellow highlighting in the 'ID' column.

Plans for next phase

The team vision for Phase IV is shown in the Gantt chart below.
Gantt chart outlining the team vision for Phase IV.

Gantt chart outlining the team vision for Phase IV.

For more detail on the team's vision for Phase IV, see the Phase IV team vision and the Phase IV individual visions (Microsoft Word .docx format).