P17485: Lightweight Concrete Roofing Tiles
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Detailed Design

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Detailed Design Phase

During this phase the team:

Final Design Choice, Modeling and Simulations

Final Tile Design

After careful consideration, we decided on the a modified version of the W-tile. The research that we did online did not reveal any better choice between the two, but we chose the W-tile because:

Here are some pictures of the tile as designed in CREO:

Final tile design that was chosen (16x22 in)

Final tile design that was chosen (16x22 in)

Simulation

Once we decided on a final tile design we decided to run a simulation on it where the only loads were gravity as well as a 200 lb load applied on top of the curve of the tile.
Results from the simulation done on the final tile design with a 200 lb force applied to the top of the tile

Results from the simulation done on the final tile design with a 200 lb force applied to the top of the tile

Batten Spacing

We also decided on some dimensions and designs for batten spacing on the roof as shown in the pictures:
Spacing dimensions

Spacing dimensions

Battens with tiles placed on top

Battens with tiles placed on top

Tile overlap dimensions

Tile overlap dimensions

Full roof with top tile

Full roof with top tile

House Assembly

We then modeled a basic house with a roof that uses the final tile design plus a draft of curved tile at the top of the roof.
Overall house assembly

Overall house assembly

Tile Overlap

Here are a couple of pictures showing how the tiles overlap:
Overlap as viewed from the front

Overlap as viewed from the front

Overlap as viewed from the left

Overlap as viewed from the left

Attachment Method

One of the things not shown on the models is the attachment system to be used for the tiles. We decided to try on the Tyle-Tye system provided by Storm-Lock and produced a few pictures to see how it would work:
The Tyle Tye wires provided by Storm-Lock tied to the W-tile provided by Eagle Roofing

The Tyle Tye wires provided by Storm-Lock tied to the W-tile provided by Eagle Roofing

The Tyle-Tye system working with the battens on the roof

The Tyle-Tye system working with the battens on the roof

Concrete Testing

For this phase we conducted a lot of concrete testing on mixes that we made. The next few pictures will take you through the journey that we went through in the past few weeks:
New mold design for test specimens

New mold design for test specimens

Making the new mold

Making the new mold

Variations considered for the mixes

Variations considered for the mixes

The team mixing concrete

The team mixing concrete

Troubleshooting a few problems with the new mold

Troubleshooting a few problems with the new mold

Conducting three-point load tests with the help of Professor Humphrey

Conducting three-point load tests with the help of Professor Humphrey

Testing Observations

'The biochar particles appear smaller in cured concrete than before mixing'

'Plastic decreases workability of concrete'

'Most designed mixes required additional water to achieve desired workability'

'Saturated biochar required more water to achieve same workability as unsaturated'

Eliminating % Water From Mix Design

'Conclusion'

Stress vs Strain Relationship

Stress Strain graphs for specimens with plastic and specimens without plastic

Stress Strain graphs for specimens with plastic and specimens without plastic

Specimen Peak Load Test Results

Peak load results

Peak load results

Weight versus peak load results

Weight versus peak load results

Conclusions

Plastic bottle fibers offer optimistic results

Particle size showed decreased weight and increased strength

Biochar and cement seems to compete for water

Experiment Factors and Levels

- Low: 0.5%

- High: 1.0%

- Low: 5%

- Medium: 10%

- High: 15%

- Low: 25%

- High: 35%

Given the number of factors and levels we need...

- 6 mixes of 3 samples each day, with drying day between

This allows us to assess our results within 3 weeks and either…

OR

Risk Assessment

We updated a few risks for this phase, which are highlighted in yellow in the table shown:
Updated risks for this phase

Updated risks for this phase

Design Review Materials

Detailed Design Presentation presented on 6th December 2016.

Here is the link to the video shown during the review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gInN22guhG8

This video demonstrates how to set up the concrete on a vibrating table, then sliding it off the table and onto a mold to make a tile.

Plans for next phase

Weeks 1 to 7

Mix Testing

Mold Design

Weeks 8 to 15

Complete Test on Tile with final mix

Imagine RIT

Customer Handoff


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