P17485: Lightweight Concrete Roofing Tiles
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Integrated System Build & Test

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Integrated System Build & Test Phase

In this phase:

Design of Experiment

The JMP output seen below shows the results of our completed design of experiment with two replications. You will notice two sections, the strength results and the weight results. For each set of results there are four accompanying plots showing how each factor affects strength and weight for respective sections.

Based on the graphs, the strength of the concrete increases as the amount of biochar, cement and water in the concrete mix increases. Although we only found a 90% statistical significance with biochar and cement.

From a weight perspective, we only found biochar to have 90% statistical significance. By increasing the amount of biochar in the mix we were able to consistently reduce the weight of the concrete.

Based on these findings we decided on our final mix to consist of 35% concrete, 20% Biochar, and 45% Sand with .423 lbs of plastic bottle fiber per cubic foot.

Strength Results

Strength Results

Weight Results

Weight Results

Attachment Method Update

In this phase, we made a tile using the full prototype of our manufacturing device. We discovered that the first nub addition accessory had too small a footprint to reliably adhere to the main tile. The design was intended to be modular so these kind of changes can be easily made. The next nub iteration will have a wider footprint for better adhesion.
Pictures of the first try at a nub addition accessory

Pictures of the first try at a nub addition accessory

Preliminary Leak Test

In this phase we were able to do some preliminary Leak Testing using test pieces that were shorter than a full tile but just as wide. We were also able to do a Leak Test on the tiles made from the last design review.
Leak testing using smaller test pieces

Leak testing using smaller test pieces

After leak testing, no water dripped through the tiles

After leak testing, no water dripped through the tiles

Leak testing using the tiles made from the last design review

Leak testing using the tiles made from the last design review

Test Rig

We made plans on making a test rig that has 9 tiles and 4 battens. This rig will be used to run our tests, and will also be used for the Imagine RIT exhibit.
A model of the test rig that we are planning to build in the next few weeks

A model of the test rig that we are planning to build in the next few weeks

Front view of the test rig

Front view of the test rig

Side view of the test rig

Side view of the test rig

Preliminary Cost Analysis

Spreadsheet for the Cost Analysis.
Cost analysis table

Cost analysis table

Pumice Rock vs. Biochar

In this phase we did some research comparing Pumice Rock with Biochar.

Pumice Rock is an extremely porous igneous rock formed during volcanic eruptions. The material can be used in several aspects like lightweight concrete or as an abrasive for a variety of products. The material generally have high enough porosities that they can float in water until it becomes filled with water. To determine whether pumice rock or biochar would be better suited for this application, we are researching the properties of the two substances. Though the resources for our project does not allow testing of pumice rock in concrete, the goal is to provide a comparison that would suggest if one material would be more useful to Nicaraguan roof tiles than the other. More research has been conducted using pumice stone in concrete compared to biochar. Pumice stone is known to have benefited the insulation properties of concrete, while research is still being done to determine the effects of biochar. Biochar is often more brittle and has less mechanical strength by nature than pumice rock, which causes areas of the biochar-concrete to be weaker.

Comparing Pumice to Biochar

Comparing Pumice to Biochar

More comparisons between Pumice and Biochar

More comparisons between Pumice and Biochar

Updated Risks

Updated risk table

Updated risk table

Updated Budget

Updated budget for this phase

Updated budget for this phase

Plans for next phase


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