P17709: ArcWorks Bottle Wrapping Station
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Detailed Design

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Detailed Design Phase

Goals for this Phase

  1. Begin initial implementation of floor plan
  2. Tape beginning set of tables for new process
  3. Modify CAD for glue well design, rolling tray, and neckband dispenser legs.
  4. Purchase wood for rolling tray.
  5. Create prototype of neckband dispenser legs and complete initial testing.
  6. Create prototype of rolling tray and start initial testing.
  7. Complete feasibility analysis of the glue well slope and run experiment to confirm.
  8. Select battery holder.
  9. Purchase motor, battery, and push button.
  10. Complete initial design for motor and push button container.

Accomplishments

  1. Set up taped tables and ran time trials, comparing them to previous trials ran.
  2. Created operations guide to new taped system.
  3. Ran experiment with carts to determine their viability in future floor layouts.
  4. Modified floor layouts for future testing.
  5. Completed experimental and theoretical testing for slope of glue well.
  6. Completed bench marking for battery holder.
  7. Created wiring diagram for push button.
  8. Created a preliminary mounting and coupling design for the motor attachment.
  9. Created prototypes of neckband dispenser legs and the rolling tray.
  10. Tested neckband dispenser legs on dispenser.
  11. Ran experiment to determine feasibility of glue remover on rollers.
  12. Modified CAD designs, Bill of Materials, Test Plans, Risk Assessments.

Process Improvements

Documentation for Workbench Experiment

The first experiment that was conducted on site was taping off one of the work benches with visual queues to signal material handlers when to deliver and pick up boxes of bottles. The flow of work moves from left to right. The first iteration of the tape allowed for 6 incoming boxes on the left and 4 outgoing boxes on the right.
Figure 1: Initial Taped Off Workbench

Figure 1: Initial Taped Off Workbench

The following documents are training materials provided on the following process changes we tested with two operators and all material handlers. In addition, a feedback form was created, for the days we could not observe the experiment.

Figure 2: Operator Process Changes

Figure 2: Operator Process Changes

Figure 3: Material Handler Process Changes

Figure 3: Material Handler Process Changes

Figure 4: Cart Implementation for Material Handlers

Figure 4: Cart Implementation for Material Handlers

Figure 5: Experiment Observation and Feedback Form

Figure 5: Experiment Observation and Feedback Form

Feedback & Observations

Throughout the experiment, observations and feedback from both operators and material handlers were obtained. The following are some of the findings:
Operators
Material Handler

Work Layout

The following layout was the way the floor was setup for the first taped off table experiments with material handlers using carts.
Figure 6: Current Benchmarked Floor Layout

Figure 6: Current Benchmarked Floor Layout

This layout shows a future state with 10 work benches. The aisle widths are able to fit a 31"x 23" cart with ease for the material handlers to use.

Figure 7: Proposed Future State Layout Floor Layout

Figure 7: Proposed Future State Layout Floor Layout

Process Changes for MSD II

Figure 8: Process Changes

Figure 8: Process Changes

Mechanical Engineering Improvements

We are looking to gain approval of the following items:
  1. Battery Holder Selection
  2. Attachment of the motor to the knob design
  3. Approval of Mechanical Test Plan

Other requests:

  1. Next semester, could we obtain a neckband dispenser to prototype the legs with?
  2. Can we remove the suction cups from one neckband dispenser?
  3. Box of Bottles, empty or not, to test with at RIT?

Feasibility: Prototyping, Analysis, Simulation

Glue Well Angle Analysis

Since our last review, we have decided not to pursue the theoretical calculation. Instead, we have experimentally determined the best angle at which to incline the glue well. Next phase we will experimentally test at ArcWorks to obtain more data.
Figure 9: Experimental Angle Calculations

Figure 9: Experimental Angle Calculations

Benchmarking of Battery Holders

The following table is a list of possible battery holders. At our last review, we decided to go forward with putting 8 AA batteries in series to make the 12V required by our motor selection. All of the battery holders in the table hold 8 AA batteries and have leads. Additionally, some have covers to protect the batteries from a limited amount of liquids and from falling out.
Figure 10: Benchmarking of Battery Holders

Figure 10: Benchmarking of Battery Holders

Our recommendation is the Jameco Reliapro 2260851. This battery holder has leads and a cover. It is approximately 4.3" in length, 2.3" in width, and 0.65" in height. It costs $3.95, not including shipping.

Figure 11: Jameco Reliapro 2260851 Battery Holder

Figure 11: Jameco Reliapro 2260851 Battery Holder

For a link to the full spreadsheet, including website links, click on the following: Benchmarking of Battery Holders

Wiring Diagram

The following figure is the wiring diagram for the modified glue well. It consists of the motor, switch (push button), 12 V Battery (8 AA Batteries in Series), and a Diode.
Figure 12: Wiring Diagram

Figure 12: Wiring Diagram

The diode limits the flow of current to one direction. Basically, it allows the current to flow "forward" when the pushbutton is engaged but once the pushbutton is released it prevents current backlash. Meaning that current can not flow in the reverse direction. This is a safety mechanism to prevent the motor from frying. We have obtained the diode from RIT.

Figure 13: How Current Flows in a Diode

Figure 13: How Current Flows in a Diode

Figure 14: Example Diode

Figure 14: Example Diode

Preliminary Mounting Design

The following figure is our preliminary design for mounting the motor, push button, and battery holder to the knob. A more detailed drawing will be created next phase. This mount will be 3D printed.
Figure 15: Preliminary Mounting Design

Figure 15: Preliminary Mounting Design

Preliminary Coupling Design

Figure 16: Preliminary Coupling Design

Figure 16: Preliminary Coupling Design

The figure above shows the preliminary design for the coupling device that will act as the interface between the motor and the turning knob on the glue roller. The device is a hollow cylinder with a ridged inner radius, that slides over the turning knob. The shape of the turning knob will be altered to reflect the interior shape of the coupling device. The motor shaft inserts into the hole in the center of the device which will be keyed to the shape of the motor shaft. The device will be 3D printed.

Prototyping of the Rolling Tray

Since our last design review, we have made a prototype of the rolling tray. The rolling tray was fabricated at the machine shop using the following mechanical drawings. The actual rolling tray can be seen in Figure XXXXX. The actual rolling tray was made out of plastic available at the machine shop at RIT, at no cost to ArcWorks.

In the next phase, we will test the rolling tray at RIT and make modifications. Once we believe the prototype is accurate we will test at ArcWorks to ensure it improves the process.

Figure 17: Mechanical Drawing #1

Figure 17: Mechanical Drawing #1

Figure 18: Mechanical Drawing #2

Figure 18: Mechanical Drawing #2

Figure 19: Mechanical Drawing #3

Figure 19: Mechanical Drawing #3

Figure 20: Isometric View of the Prototype Rolling Tray

Figure 20: Isometric View of the Prototype Rolling Tray

Figure 21: Plan View of the Prototype Rolling Tray

Figure 21: Plan View of the Prototype Rolling Tray

Prototyping of the Neckband Dispenser Legs

We have made a couple of different prototype of the neckband dispenser legs since our last review. The first prototype had an opening that was not sufficient to fit over the bottom of the neckband dispenser.
Figure 22: Isometric View of the Original Prototype of Neckband Dispenser Leg

Figure 22: Isometric View of the Original Prototype of Neckband Dispenser Leg

Figure 23: Plan View of the Original Prototype of Neckband Dispenser Leg

Figure 23: Plan View of the Original Prototype of Neckband Dispenser Leg

The second neckband dispenser leg had a slightly larger opening that we believe is adequate to fit over the neckband dispenser.

Figure 24: Plan View of the Second Prototype of the Neckband Dispenser Leg

Figure 24: Plan View of the Second Prototype of the Neckband Dispenser Leg

Figure 25: Comparison of the Prototypes for the Neckband Dispenser Leg

Figure 25: Comparison of the Prototypes for the Neckband Dispenser Leg

The final leg will have a rubber coating on the bottom to ensure that it does not slide on the table. The fit of the leg will also be tighter to ensure that the leg does not slip of the neckband dispenser. We request approval to remove the suction cups off one neckband dispenser to ensure the proper fit.

Cleaning Glue Rollers

Some glue well rollers show signs of corrosion and can sometimes get stuck during operation. Based on the recommendation of the RIT machine shop, Goof Off was used to clean the glue rollers. One end of a roller was submerged in Goof Off for approximately 3 hours before being removed and wiped clean. The Goof Off removed a layer of dried glue but didn't have much of an effect on the corrosion. This could be a possible solution to prevent glue rollers from getting stuck.
Figure 26: Photograph of Glue Roller after Cleaning

Figure 26: Photograph of Glue Roller after Cleaning

Figure 27: Up Close Photograph of Glue Roller after Cleaning

Figure 27: Up Close Photograph of Glue Roller after Cleaning

CAD Drawings

Improve Glue Well Design

Figure 28: CAD Glue Well with Modifications

Figure 28: CAD Glue Well with Modifications

The main changes to the glue well from the previous version is the mounting being placed apart from the glue well now. It is not attached to the knob and will rotate with it via a shaft.

Rolling Tray Design

Figure 29: CAD Rolling Tray

Figure 29: CAD Rolling Tray

Fro the rolling tray, we changed the inside curve to better fit the bottle, ensuring a better fit when rolling. The edges have also been rounded.

Neckband Dispenser Legs

Figure 30: CAD Neckband Dispenser Legs

Figure 30: CAD Neckband Dispenser Legs

The gap of the neckband dispenser leg has been increased from previous version to fit around the metal.

Bill of Material (BOM)

The following figure, is the updated bill of materials since our last review. We have purchased the motor and the wood so far. Before our semester ends the push button will have been ordered as well.
Figure 31: Updated Bill of Materials (BOM)

Figure 31: Updated Bill of Materials (BOM)

Test Plans

The mechanical engineering and process improvement test plans have been updated since the last review and can be found with the following links:

Process Improvement Test Plan

Mechanical Engineering Test Plan

Risk Assessment

MSD I Risk Assessment: Risk Assessment

Design Review Materials

Plans for next phase

MSD II Project Plan: Project Plan

Personal Goals for Next Phase

Emily Hebert's Three Week Plan: Emily's Plan

Troy Bailey's Three Week Plan: Troy's Plan

Cassie Kaczmarek's Three Week Plan: Cassie's Plan

Kyle Chrysler's Three Week Plan: Kyle's Plan

Lachlan Newcomb's Three Week Plan: Lachlan's Plan

Justin Cook's Three Week Plan: Justin's Plan


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