P17709: ArcWorks Bottle Wrapping Station
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Integrated System Build & Test

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Subsystem Level Build & Test Phase

What we planned to do during this phase

  1. Finish design of bottom of Motor Box
  2. Finish design of motor coupling
  3. Begin design of motor box top
  4. Complete the wiring of the system
  5. Finish prototyping rolling tray
  6. Complete the design of the neckband dispenser legs
  7. Choose material to place on bottom of neckband dispenser legs
  8. Begin testing of mechanical improvements
  9. Continue testing of industrial engineering improvements and monitor production levels

What we accomplished during this phase

  1. Determine the level of glue to place in glue well's
  2. Finalized the motor box bottom design
  3. Initial prototyping of motor box top design
  4. Tested different materials for underneath the bottom of the neckband legs
  5. Finialized the neckband dispenser leg design
  6. Tested push-button response time
  7. Designed the second prototype for rolling tray and ordered material
  8. Tested the 3D printed coupling and determined that a 3D printed part would not work after speaking with the machine shop.
  9. Redesigned coupling so that the machine shop can manufacture the coupling out of aluminum.

Industrial Engineering Improvements

Glue-Well Test

After measuring the glue-level in 10 of the glue wells during a break at ArcWorks this is what we found:

 Glue-Level Test

Glue-Level Test

Productivity Increase

Increase in production per operator in bottle-wrapping station since January 2017 (almost 11 months ago):

 Daily Case Production Increase/ Operator

Daily Case Production Increase/ Operator

Standard Work Survey Results

During the last review, everyone filled out a Standard Work Survey so we could gauge how far to go when developing standard work documents for the bottle-wrapping station. Here are the results from that survey:

 Standard Work Survey Results

Standard Work Survey Results

Since most of the averages were around 2 we've decided to create standard work documents for restocking, cart use, setup, cleanup, and changeover (not the actual bottle-wrapping but we will create one for the rolling tray's operation).

Standard Work Documents

Restocking Policy/Cart Use

Setup/ Cleanup & Changeovers

Opportunities for Increased Productivity

Here are additional tasks we can pursue to increase productivity within the bottle wrapping station:

  1. Material handlers pre-stamping labels
  2. Quality/ production metrics on white-board posted in bottle-wrapping area
  3. Continuous changeovers (even when flavor changes)
  4. Utilize additional cart
    1. One cart to distribute cases, another to collect
    2. Never carry cases rule
  5. Signals (flags for example) for when operator is running low on cases and needs material handler to deliver additional cases

Mechanical Engineering Improvements

Motor Box

Motor Box Bottom

The motor box has been modified since the last review:
  1. The box for the push button was added.
  2. The length and width of the motor box were increased.
  3. A piece was attached towards the end of the motor to hold it in place better.
  4. The motor holders and hole were raised.
 Motor Box bottom

Motor Box bottom

Motor Box Top

The motor box top has changed since last time:
  1. The outer dimensions of the motor box top have been enlarged to fit the new dimensions of the motor box bottom.
  2. A support to hold down the motor has been added
  3. The height of the top has been lengthened
  4. The slot for the motor shaft has been modified for a better fit.
 Preliminary Motor Box Top: Isometric Top View

Preliminary Motor Box Top: Isometric Top View

 Preliminary Motor Box Top: Isometric Bottom View

Preliminary Motor Box Top: Isometric Bottom View

 Preliminary Motor Box Top Drawing

Preliminary Motor Box Top Drawing

Motor Coupling / Motor Wobble

The final CAD model of the motor coupling has been completed. The following figures show the finalized design.
 Finalized Coupling Design: Isometric View of Knob End

Finalized Coupling Design: Isometric View of Knob End

 Finalized Coupling Design: Isometric View of Motor End

Finalized Coupling Design: Isometric View of Motor End

 Finalized Coupling Drawing

Finalized Coupling Drawing

After the CAD model was completed, we 3D printed the coupling. Then we permanently attached the rolling pin to the coupling using J-B Weld. We attempted to remove the coupling using force to no avail. Only by grinding or heating the J-B weld can it be removed.

 Coupling Permanently Attached to Rolling Pin with J-B Weld

Coupling Permanently Attached to Rolling Pin with J-B Weld

Then we started testing the motor and rolling pin. A noticeable wobble was detected in the rolling pin when the motor was engaged. We brought the setup down to the machine shop. The shop analyzed the system and determined that the error was with the 3D printed coupling.

To address this error we have decided to make the coupling out of Aluminum. The aluminum coupling will have a set screw to make sure that it is removable from both the motor and knob. The material has been sourced from the RIT machine shop at no cost to ArcWorks. The following figures detail the new design.

 New Coupling Design, Rolling Pin End

New Coupling Design, Rolling Pin End

 New Coupling Design, Motor End

New Coupling Design, Motor End

 Drawing of Aluminum Coupling

Drawing of Aluminum Coupling

Gate Hook

We went to purchase the gate hook at Lowe's a few weeks ago and were surprised by the bulk. It is 6" in length, which is what we wanted but it is too bulky. The diameter is too large as are the attachment brackets. This is no longer a viable option. Other attachment ideas are currently being explored.
 National Hardware Gate Hook and Eye Hook

National Hardware Gate Hook and Eye Hook

Modified Neckband Dispenser Legs

The last prototype was finished:
  1. The thickness of the side walls were increased
  2. The top of the leg was decreased to fit underneath the metal bar.
 Latest Neckband Dispenser Leg Prototype

Latest Neckband Dispenser Leg Prototype

These were tested at Arcworks on one of the Neckband Dispensers. When fitted with a nearly full roll, there was more than enough room underneath for the device to function properly.

Rubber for Under Legs

Different materials were tested to put on the bottom of the neckband dispenser legs.

The first was rubber bumpers made for kitchen cupboards:

 Rubber Bumpers for Bottom of Neckband Dispenser Leg

Rubber Bumpers for Bottom of Neckband Dispenser Leg

These cost $3.98 and did not work well. The base with the adhesive is larger than the portion that touches the table. This makes the neckband dispenser leg unstable. These rubber bumpers are intended to soften the slam of a cupboard.

The second was a Non-slip Mat for Car Dashboards:

 Non-slip Mat for Bottom of Neckband Dispenser Leg

Non-slip Mat for Bottom of Neckband Dispenser Leg

This cost $5.99 and is a non-slip mat made for the dashboard of a car to keep your cell phone from sliding. The mat is 11" x 6" and weighs 2.1 ounces. This material does not an adhesive side so it will need to be glued to the bottom of the neckband leg.

This material seems to work the best out of the three. This mat could be cut so that 65 legs could be done with one sheet. This is equivalent to 16.25 sets of 4 legs. The cost would be approximately $0.09 per leg or $0.37 per set.

The third was a non-slip grip pad:

 Non-slip Grip Pad for Bottom of Neckband Dispenser Leg

Non-slip Grip Pad for Bottom of Neckband Dispenser Leg

This cost $3.97 for 2 sheets that are 4" x 5". These pads are intended to keep household objects in place, such as lamps and stereo systems. One side has the non-slip grip and the other has adhesive. The adhesive is most likely not sticky enough to keep the material bonded to the leg forever. Further testing would need to be done to determine if an additional glue would need to be used. From one sheet, 20 legs could be done. Two sheets come in one pack so 40 total legs could be done or 10 sets. Each leg would cost $0.10 to cover or $0.40 per set of 4.

Rolling Tray

Initial CAD Base Model of Rolling Tray

Initial CAD Base Model of Rolling Tray

The major change to the original rolling tray made during this phase was changing the distance between the edge of the tray and the curved rolling edge that guides the bottles during label application. Initially the labels were not aligned properly so that the print at the bottom was not visible. After testing the tray at Arcworks we concluded that this change fixed this alignment issue.

Current CAD Model of Rolling Tray

Current CAD Model of Rolling Tray

Current CAD Base Model of Rolling Tray

Current CAD Base Model of Rolling Tray

A second piece of HDPE was ordered from McMaster-Carr and will be used to create a second tray. The primary differences between this second tray and the original are slight dimension changes made to the curved rolling edge that guides the bottles and a dimension change to the overall length of the indented area that is intended to help prevent the label from shifting during the application process. Finally, the second tray will also be thicker to help make it more resistant to warping in the future.

Costs

Costs of 3D Printing

 Tracking of 3D Printing Costs

Tracking of 3D Printing Costs

Bill of Materials

 Updated Bill of Materials

Updated Bill of Materials

This BOM has been updated to omit the gate hook. Additionally, the HDPE material for the second rolling tray prototype has been added. Also, the costs of the motor and push button have been updated to include shipping. The new total is $176.06.

This total include the $40+ for 1 day shipping of the HDPE sheet. Since this item did not arrive the next day, we will be contacting UPS for a refund.

Test Plans

ME Test Plan

IE Test Plan

Risk and Problem Tracking

Functional Demo Materials

The agenda for this presentation can be found at the following link: Agenda

Plans for next phase

Entering Verification & Validation Phase:

 Verification & Validation Phase Project Plan

Verification & Validation Phase Project Plan

Individual Plans:

Emily Hebert's Integrated System Build & Test Phase Plan: Emily's Plan

Troy Bailey's Integrated System Build & Test Phase Plan: Troy's Plan

Justin Cook's Integrated System Build & Test Phase Plan: Justin's Plan

Cassie Kaczmarek's Integrated System Build & Test Phase Plan: Cassie's Plan

Lachlan Newcomb's Integrated System Build & Test Phase Plan: Lachlan's Plan

AMA IE Side Project

Update:

  1. Visited AMA in Churchville with Mike and Tricia
  2. Got to see AMA's facility, layout, and meet their operational staff and owner
  3. Continuing to develop cost estimate for bringing printing in-house
  4. Meeting with printing professor from RIT (who we've met with previously)
  5. Question: Monthly demand (# of bottles) for printing? Need estimate for cost analysis

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