P18025: ZoomTots RIT
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Systems Design

Table of Contents

Team Vision for System-Level Design Phase

The goal for this portion of the project was to approach solving the problem in a non-solution oriented way. Completing processes such as the functional decomposition allowed for a customer and engineering requirement focused design process. This allowed for a wide range of design options to consider that were slowly narrowed down to a preliminary concept selection.

Improvements from Last Review

Accomplished Goals from Last Review

Alaiya

Allison

Brady

Mia

Austin

Functional Decomposition

The main function for this project is to provide experimental stimulus and independence to the child. The 3 categories below are the ways to accomplish the main function.

Do no harm

Functional Decomposition Category 1: Safety

Functional Decomposition Category 1: Safety

Provide interaction with the world that the child can control

Functional Decomposition Category 2: Interaction

Functional Decomposition Category 2: Interaction

Provide mobility

Functional Decomposition Category 3: Mobility

Functional Decomposition Category 3: Mobility

Benchmarking

There are three main mobility aids for children with CP:

  1. Modified Ride-On cars such as those seen in University of Maryland's Go Baby Go! Program
  2. Powered Wheelchairs
  3. Gait Trainers

The main customer goal is to provide a mobility solution for A based off of a Go Baby Go! Design. However, benchmarking is useful in that it can provide inspiration on how to further modify our car. We have developed a set of selection criteria based on our functional decomposition to determine what the “best available solution” is:

Benchmarking Table

Benchmarking Table

Concept Development

Cerebral Palsy (CP)

CP is a neurological disorder caused by a non-progressive brain injury or malformation that occurs while the child’s brain is under development. It’s non-life-threatening, so people with CP have similar life expectancy as a regular adult. CP is a little bit more common than people think; it occurs in every 2.1 per 1,000 babies. If our car design works well for A, then there’s a possibility to help many more children.

The effects of CP vary greatly. The main affect of CP is loss of control of certain body movements. Limbs can be stiff, and forced into painful, awkward positions. Coordination, muscle tone, and reflexes can also be affected. Because muscles affect how bones grow, those with CP tend to be shorter and height and are at a greater risk for scoliosis.

Because of the above symptoms, children around A’s age have trouble with hand-eye coordination, balance/posture, grasping objects, and just generally getting their muscles to perform the action they want. All of this will greatly affect the design of our car. We also have to keep in mind that the overall goal is to improve the quality of life for A; we will do this by giving him the ability to explore his environment, and promoting his ability to perform self-care tasks.

Powered Wheelchairs

One-third of children with CP are non-ambulant and require the use of a wheelchair. Having a wheelchair is extremely important for kids with CP since mobility is important for the cognitive and psychosocial development of children. Wheelchairs can also provide a degree of independent mobility and reduce the dependence on caregivers. A recent study performed on children with CP has proven that the sooner a child with CP is introduced to using a wheelchair, the higher degree of independent mobility is achieved (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2933698/).

The average cost of a powered wheelchair is around $7,132. This is much more money than most families can afford. Because mobility at an early age is so important to a child with CP, our modified ride-on car can be an important intermediate step for families than cannot immediately afford a powered wheelchair. Children also are not generally given a powered wheelchair until the age of three. Our car is intended to be used by children aged from 1-3, and will be designed with the intention of being similar to a powered wheelchair. One of the most important components of a powered wheelchair that we may incorporate into our design, is a joystick used for steering.

Powered Wheelchair Controls

Powered Wheelchair Controls

Microcontroller

Microcontroller Information

Microcontroller Information

Remote Control

Feasibility: Prototyping, Analysis, Simulation

Feasibility Table

Feasibility Chart

Feasibility Chart

Torque Testing

Wheel Torque Test

Wheel Torque Test

Morphological Chart and Concept Selection

Morphological Chart:Part 1

Morphological Chart:Part 1

Morphological Chart:Part 2

Morphological Chart:Part 2

Concept Selection

Pugh Chart Datum (developed using the morphological chart)

Pugh Chart Datum

Pugh Chart Datum

Pugh Chart

Pugh Chart

Pugh Chart

Child Controls Decision Matrix

Child Controls Decision Matrix

Child Controls Decision Matrix

Microcontroller Decision Matrix

Microcontroller Decision Matrix

Microcontroller Decision Matrix

Bluetooth Control Decision Matrix

Bluetooth Control Decision Matrix

Bluetooth Control Decision Matrix

Battery Decision Matrix

Battery Decision Matrix

Battery Decision Matrix

Systems Architecture

Systems Architecture

Systems Architecture

Designs and Flowcharts

Software State Machine

Software State Machine

Preliminary BOM

Preliminary BOM Based on Major Systems

Preliminary BOM Based on Major Systems

Risk Assessment

Updated Risk Assessment Table

Updated Risk Assessment Table

Design Review Materials

Included links to:

Plans for next phase

Allison

Brady

Alaiya

Kathryn

Austin

Mia


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