P18027: Neonatal Medical Transport
/public/

Building Subsystems

Table of Contents

Subsystem Building

Subsystem testing allowed us to see errors not originally seen in computer renderings or smaller paper models. Many changes were made as a result of the testing.

Image 1: Alexa Boyd (Interior Design) testing the location of the seating with a bench.

Image 1: Alexa Boyd (Interior Design) testing the location of the seating with a bench.

Image 2: The completed shell with all cardboard subsystems at the time of building placed in their intended locations.

Image 2: The completed shell with all cardboard subsystems at the time of building placed in their intended locations.

The Window: During the build process plans were altered for usability. The window for communication passing through from the cab to the back of the vehicle was raised from the original plan. After planning out the original height of the window it appeared too low to provide effective communication between the two sections of the vehicle. It also looked as though the incubator against that wall would obstruct much of the window, so the decision was made to raise the window.

Initial Testing

To test usability and reachability of the space, objects and supplies were made out of cardboard. This allowed us to make sure that everything fit and was accessible if needed form the seat.

Changes from Original Plan

The Incubator Carts: The incubator cart design was created out of wood and PVC pipe. The first cart built (Image 2-A) was the correct external dimension but not the correct internal dimension. This means that it could not hold the correct sized incubator model. However an earlier incubator model was made of cardboard not of the correct dimensions that could be used for reachability testing. The second cart (Image 2-B) was built to the correct dimensions internally and externally.

The Passenger Chair: Originally the storage box seen in Image 2 was to be a passenger chair for a family member of one of the infants being transported. This was after much deliberation, and talking with various emergency medical professionals. The passenger chair was removed at the suggestion of all of the EMS staff spoken with, as well as the need for more room for medical storage. If a family member of one of the infants wishes to ride along then they will sit in the passenger seat in the cab accompanying the driver. This should allow for a more controlled environment in the section of the vehicle with the infant and medical professional, as well as allow for adequate storage space for all needed materials.

Additional Storage Unit: The last big change from the original plan seen above is the addition of a storage unit above on of the incubators (seen in Image 3 below). This was added after viewing a New York State neonatal transport ambulance, and seeing their storage options in the vehicle. This will allow for more storage in a reachable place from the medical professionals seat.

Testing

During Subsystem Building Alexa Boyd and Ankha Khosbayar created a testing plan and executed it with the help of RIT's Human Factors Class. The Human Factors class came to our prototype and provided feedback as to what needed further refinement and what worked in the space. Click Here to see their testing and results.

The New Floor Plans

 Image 3: The new elevation plan with the shelving above the incubator, removed passenger seat, and added details.

Image 3: The new elevation plan with the shelving above the incubator, removed passenger seat, and added details.

 Image 4:The new elevation plans with added detail, and the passenger seat removed in favor of storage.

Image 4:The new elevation plans with added detail, and the passenger seat removed in favor of storage.

Image 5: The final rendering of the inside space (note: storage over incubator not pictured).

Image 5: The final rendering of the inside space (note: storage over incubator not pictured).

Next Steps

The next steps of the subsystem building is to build the storage, chair, and incubators out of better materials then cardboard. Additionally, flooring, paint, and medical equipment will be added to the space to make it look realistic.