P18485: Biochar Concrete Roofing Tile Manufacturing and Complete Roof System
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Build & Test Prep

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Build & Test Prep Phase

Phase Objectives:

In this phase the team would like to accomplish these tasks:

Individual tasks:

In this phase, the team has divided these goals into these themes and assignments:

MSD I Re-Cap and Winter Break Updates

Re-Cap of Detailed Design

For those that were unable to attend the presentation for the the Detailed Design Review, click HERE for a link to our EDGE page. Some of the major decisions and accomplishments from this phase and review were:

 Full Test Roof

Full Test Roof

Updated Test Roof Budget

Updated Test Roof Budget

Updates

Since our last review, the team has been focusing on:

Budgeting

As of this Phase, the team has spent about 44% of the allowed budget on the project. Below is a table showing budget allocation for the project:

Budgeting for Semester

Budgeting for Semester

Design of Experiments

With the Samples created and cured, the next step of the DOE is to test each sample. This includes reaching out to Lab Coordinators to find time for training and time to test. Matt was able to train with the Lab Coordinator. Below is a picture of our fully cured samples:

Finished Cured Samples

Finished Cured Samples

Benchmarking

After finding out that the process was already established in other regions on Nicaragua, the team was been using ECO SUR South's process to benchmark against, to be able to create a tile and process that would be able out compete and out live current Mirco-Concrete Companies in the market. Below is a link to an informative video about the process used by ECO SUR SOUTH.

Company Logo

Company Logo

Creation of Tile via Eco-Sur South Equipment and Method - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyAwpJ8D_mk

Putting Tiles on the Room Framing - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2hyZ7_mhW0

Mold Design

Dan has been leading the Mold Design for the team. More on this topic below in other sections.

Manufacturing FlowChart

The manufacturing flowchart has not changed since the last phase. Some of the steps did have some sub-process changes, which added new materials to the manufacturing BOM. Here is the Flowchart for a Review:

 Current Process Map

Current Process Map

Systems Architecture

To show what was worked on, and what is being worked on, and what needs work, below is a systems architecture. The purple is what was planned to be started in MSD II, and the red is what was finished in MSD I.

Updated Arch

Updated Arch

Addition of Business Team

Leslie Moore was able to share this project with one of his project based classes, and the addition of students from the Saunders School of Business will be joining the project this semester. The week of Feb 5th will be when preliminary discussions will occur about deliverables, skills and expectations.

Test Plan Summary

Concrete Strength Test

Arrangements have been made to begin sample testing on February 6th, 2018 with completion expected by February 9th, 2018. These results will test us the strongest mixture. From there, we will determine the most feasible combination of materials to use to make out tiles.

The samples will be test based on ASTM C293 Concrete Center Point Loading.

Mold Materials Test

In order to prepare for using the vacuum former, it was decided that we would conduct a test on two different types of styrofoam with two different protective coverings to determine which performs best. Our initial test plan involved more material types, but the cost of such a test was too high and we reduced it to only the necessities. We will have two samples each of styrofoam and smoothfoam, and cover these samples with bondo and plaster of paris. We will vacuum form over these samples with a piece of 1/8 inch thick ABS, and make the positive for the mold out of whichever material performs best.

Tile Tests

To recap, below is are plans we have to test each engineering requirement.
Test Plans Mapped to Engineering Requirements

Test Plans Mapped to Engineering Requirements

Below are the test instructions and documents:

New Mold Design

Before this phase, we were deciding between one of two mold designs, which we called "stackable mold" and "nub mold".
 Stackable mold

Stackable mold

The advantage of the stackable mold was that it had great efficiency of vertical space, required only one mold per tile, and each mold was supported by the concrete beneath it, so there were no worries about the plastic sagging. The problem with this design is that it did not account for the tile nubs, which would have to be worked around or added on later using some sort of adhesive.
Nub Mold

Nub Mold

The advantages of the nub mold was that it included the nub in the mold and didn't require the separate creation and attachment of a nub. The downsides were that it required two molds per tile and had less vertical space efficiency than the stackable mold.

Through our research of other examples of tile making, we discovered that the method used by Eco-Sur and by the previous tile team to achieve the best of both worlds for this problem was to pour the concrete into a frame that contained molds for the nubs, as shown below:

Pour Frame

Pour Frame

when the frame is lifted, the two nubs remain, due to the concrete's tendency to retain its shape (like wet sand). This flat tile is then slid onto the mold, and these molds are stacked onto each other with enough offset to allow for the height of the nubs. This design allows for stackable molds, the use of only one mold per tile instead of two, and keeps the nub from having to be attached separately. The mold was redesigned according to this.

Offest Mold

Offest Mold

Offset Mold Stack with Tiles

Offset Mold Stack with Tiles

The upside-down nature of the mold also negates the risk of any concrete slipping off the sides of the mold while drying. Now that the plastic is not being supported from underneath, it was necessary to analyze the amount of bending that would occur in the mold once fully weighted with concrete. To do this, the mold was modeled in Creo with constraints put around the edges of the mold and an 18 lb load distributed evenly across the surface.

Offset Mold Simulation

Offset Mold Simulation

The results of this simulation show that a 1/8th inch thick plastic mold would be able to support the weight of a tile with very little deformation.

Mold BOM

Mold BOM

Above is the Bill of Materials for one mold of the new design, not including the form that will be vacuum formed over.

Manufacturing Plans

Design possible layout(s) of the facility including where each process step would be completed, explaining how the layout allows for smooth flow of people, materials and information.

Evaluate the cost of the manufacturing setup including the cost of machines, materials, consumables.

Addition of two business students to the project will allow for help with supply chain management.

Risk and Problem Tracking

Below is a Risk assessment table showing the updated Risks for this Phase:
Risks

Risks

Plans for next phase

Planned Action Items in this Phase that we didn't finish:

The team will focus on these deliverables in the next Phase:

Below is a Gantt chart for our plan.

Phase Planning

Phase Planning

Our Vision of the Imagine RIT exhibit:

Individual Plans

Connor's Three Week plan

Derick's 3 week plan

Dan's 3 week plan

Matt's MSD II Plan


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