P18485: Biochar Concrete Roofing Tile Manufacturing and Complete Roof System
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Integrated System Build & Test

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Integrated System Build & Test Phase

Phase Objectives:

In this phase the team would like to accomplish these tasks:

Individual tasks:

In this phase, the team has divided these goals into these themes and assignments:

Updates

Pulse of the Project

With only 24 days until IMAGINE RIT, the Engineering team has been working on making sure that the scope can be created without a heavy crash of work. As of right now, some updates include:

Pouring and Curing Below is a chart showing when we will be planning to pour some of the tiles. We will be able to pour 4 Normal, N-tiles for each Batch. We will need for our minimum amount to complete our tests, 12.5 tiles, however we are hoping to have at least 14-16, to accommodate for all of our needs and the Saunders team's needs. The legend for the chart is below as well.

Engineering Team Pour Chart

Engineering Team Pour Chart

Subsystem Decomposition

Below is the Subsystem Decomposition showing what features the team has been working on this phase:

Subsystem Architecture

Subsystem Architecture

Current Business Case Summary

What the Saunders Team has been working on:
Supply Chain and Locations

Supply Chain and Locations

Mold Prep and Design

Creating the plastic molds is a three step process:
  1. Maching out foam negative
    1. Two pieces of foam insulation board were glued together with a spray adhesive and machined. Machining was done on the CNC router in the Construct, using a 5/8" ball mill. CAM programming was done in Inventor HSM with the help of Mike Buffalin.
  2. Pour plaster into negative
    1. Two 128 oz buckets of plaster were mixed and poured into the mold. During our first attempt to mix the plaster, we made the mistake of putting the powder in first, then putting in water. This caused the plaster to harden before we could pour. For our next attempt, we sprinkled plaster into the water, which worked much better. We allowed the plaster to cool for 8 days before forming.
  3. Form plastic over plaster positive
Milling Foam

Milling Foam

Finished Foam Negative

Finished Foam Negative

Poured Plaster

Poured Plaster

Top Tile

Top Tile Mold Model

Top Tile Mold Model

To make the mold for the top tile, we will bend a piece of 16-gauge aluminum sheet into the shape of the top tile. The metal will then be fastened to wood supports to be able to stack multiple molds and increase the rigidity of the mold.
Top Tile with Metal Wire for Attachment

Top Tile with Metal Wire for Attachment

Finished Roof Model

Finished Roof Model

Upcoming Tests

Matching Tests to Tiles

Below are the tiles that were specified above in the updates section, under the 'Pour Chart'. We have mapped out which tiles will be used for which tests, based on how long the tiles need to cure for, and what strength they have to be. Notice that our priority is to complete our needed tiles with at least one for the Saunders Display, and then continue (In RED) to produce for a better experience for both our team and Saunders for IMAGINE RIT.

Fabricated Tile Testing Designations

Fabricated Tile Testing Designations

As a reminder for the tests that are upcoming in the next few weeks, here are descriptions:

Heat Comparison

Water Resistance

Wind Resistance Test

Strength Test

Manufacturing

Task Breakdown Structure

Below is the task breakdown for the manufacturing process with estimated times for each task.

The data was collected by watching the video of EcoSure tile creation and then scaled up by 150% for necessary tasks (pour concrete onto frame, fill nubs with concrete, etc.). From there we adjusted the numbers to account for errors and/or unforeseen circumstances (machine downtime, sick workers, product defects, learning curve, etc.)

The total estimated time to create 20 tiles in a day is 4 hours, 10 minutes, and 29 seconds. (includes cleaning of molds and moving of inventory to next area)

When considering an 8 hour workday, there are 6 hours of productivity for workers. Other time can be used to grind pumice, shred plastic, order more materials, and other miscellaneous

Task Breakdown Final

Task Breakdown Final

Inventory Movement Time

Below is a chart for the calculations made to determine the time to move designated tiles forward one step.

Inventory Movement Times

Inventory Movement Times

Bucket Amount Calculation

Material Bucket Calculation

Material Bucket Calculation

Space Requirements Table

Below is the space requirements for tasks in the manufacturing process. As you can see for the curing and finished inventory, the required amount of space is significantly lower than the area projected for the task. This is so that there are 3 foot walkways so that workers can ergonomically pick and place tiles.

The total amount of space needed is 50x60 square foot area.

Tabular Space Requirements

Tabular Space Requirements

Updated Facility Layout

Below is the updated facility layout. The tasks outlined in yellow are to signify that the task needs a roof over it. All other tasks are covered by a tarp except for plastic shredding & 7 day cure. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Updated Facility Layout

Updated Facility Layout

Plans for next phase

Risks and Problem Tracking

Below is our Risk Assessment for this phase:
RiskAssessment

RiskAssessment

Below is our problem tracking table. This tool is useful in conquering some of the obstacles in an organized manner. Note that not all problems have been solved yet.

Problem Tracking

Problem Tracking

Plans for next phase

The team will focus on these deliverables in the next Phase:

As a Visual, a Critical Path Diagram has been created. This diagram showcases all the steps needed to be taken, which step precedence preserved by the spacing and flow of tasks. As a note, THE RED IS THE CRITICAL PATH, or the longest and most important to complete series of events. This will be a priority to complete right away.

Critical Path Diagram

Critical Path Diagram

Here is a legend for the Diagram above:
Legend for Critical Path Diagram

Legend for Critical Path Diagram

Here is a Ghantt Chart reflecting similar tasks to be completed.
Gantt Chart

Gantt Chart

Individual Plans

Connor's Three Week plan

Derick's 3 week plan

Dan's 3 week plan

Matt's MSD II Plan


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