P19104: HABIP-BioX
/public/

DACQ and CBOB Preliminary Detailed Design

Table of Contents

DACQ and CBOB Preliminary Detailed Design

Board Level IO

In order to make sure the boards will work together, all IO and functions are described below. By having all IO listed in one place for each board along with the functionality, it is much more likely that everything will work together.

System IO

System IO

New Processor

The main processor for the DACQ and CBOB has been changed. The old processor (SAME70-XPLD) only broke out one SPI port, and because both of these boards are working as a master and a slave over SPI, two SPI ports are needed. At the cost of power, the new processor is selected to be the Pocket Beagle. The Pocket Beagle has 512MB of RAM and more processing power than the SAME70. Below is a photo of the Pocket Beagle.
Pocket Beagle

Pocket Beagle

DACQ Block Diagram

The purpose of the Data Acquisition Board (DACQ) is to be a central point for all data regarding the platform of the SF1 to come to and be saved. This data can be communicated out to the communications board. The DACQ also acquires data from the power monitoring board (PMB) over a SPI connection. A block diagram of the board is show below.

DACQ Block Diagram

DACQ Block Diagram

DACQ Schematics

A major portion of this phase was spent putting together schematic diagrams for the DACQ and CBOB. Below are some screenshots of the DACQ Schematics.

DACQ Schematic 1

DACQ Schematic 1

DACQ Schematic 2

DACQ Schematic 2

CBOB Block Diagram

The purpose of the Cluster Breakout Board (CBOB) is to act as a master for a grouping of four BioCells. Doing this allows for much less work to be done inside the cells themselves, which is necessary given their limited size of the boards. The CBOB takes data and images over SPI from the cells and stores it onto its micro-SD card using the Pocket Beagle. These images and data can be sent to the Comms board over a separate SPI network. The board itself also regulates 3.3V for each cell, with a maximum power of 3.3W. The current to each cell is monitored and relayed back to the Pocket Beagle over I2C. The board also has a temperature sensor on it. This can all be seen below in the CBOB block diagram.

CBOB Block Diagram

CBOB Block Diagram

CBOB Schematics

Along with making the schematics for the DACQ, a major portion of this phase was spent creating the schematics for the CBOB. These can be seen below. The connectors for each cell still need to be selected, along with some other minor changes.

CBOB Schematic 1

CBOB Schematic 1

CBOB Schematic 2

CBOB Schematic 2

Engineering Requirements Update and Test Plans

As this project has developed and we've gained a stronger understanding of the tasks that need to be accomplished, the engineering requirements have changed. In this case, some have been added to reflect the requirements of the DACQ and CBOB a bit more clearly. This can be seen below. Also shown in this figure are some basic test plans to meet these requirements. These obviously do not cover all tests that need to be done to ensure the boards are working. What is completed at this point can be seen below.

New ERs and Tests

New ERs and Tests

Budget Update

A BOM is created for a majority of the parts in this phase. These are based on the schematic. The BOM is shown below.

BOM

BOM

From this BOM, the budget remaining is calculated, as shown by the multiple figures below. Also shown is the contribution of each item makes to the total budget allocated for the CBOB and DACQ.

Budget Remaining

Budget Remaining

Budget Breakdown

Budget Breakdown

System Breakdown

System Breakdown


Home | Planning & Execution | Imagine RIT

Problem Definition | Systems Design | Preliminary Detailed Design | Detailed Design

Build & Test Prep | Subsystem Build & Test | Integrated System Build & Test | Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation