P19231: Training Wheels
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Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Final Demo

Accomplished Tasks

Incomplete Tasks

Test Results Summary

O-SHIFT in use

O-SHIFT in use

The O-SHIFT is still pending user testing. We are looking for some of the selected users to attempt to learn manual driving through the O-SHIFT and other users just to learn using a manual vehicle, and see if the two methods are comparable. Data collection is difficult due to the lack of SD card in the O-SHIFT system, but that does not eliminate means of collecting user data. A team member can sit in the passenger seat of the O-SHIFT and manually enter data into a computer while user testing either vehicle.

Test Plans

P19231 Test Plans

Risk and Problem Tracking

Risk Management

As the project has come to a termination, all risk managements values for likelihood and severity have been reduced to zero. All problems we were previously tracking have also been concluded.

Risk Assesment 1

Risk Assesment 1

Risk Assesment 2

Risk Assesment 2

Risk Assesment 3

Risk Assesment 3

P19231 Risk Management

Problem Tracking

Problem Tracking

Problem Tracking

P19231 Problem Tracking

Final Paper

P19231 Final Paper

Final Poster

public/Poster top.PNGcenter Final Project Poster

Final Project Design

Overall O-SHIFT system

Overall O-SHIFT system

Final Clutch Subsystem Models/Drawings

The Clutch subsystem was redesigned to fit in the new location on the floor of the 2010 Ford Fusion. A Step Down Plate was added to align the rubber pedal pad of the unit with the brake pedal of the Fusion as closely as possible. While the alignment was not as exact as desired, user comfort was not considerably sacrificed.

The wooden block component was added to the side of the rotating upright arms of the clutch pedal unit. This wooden block would place the limit switch needed to read the half-way point of the clutch pedal in the proper position. This limit switch effectively bridged the gap between mechanical motion and electrical signal.

Clutch Pedal Unit in Starting Position

Clutch Pedal Unit in Starting Position

Clutch Pedal Unit in Depressed Position

Clutch Pedal Unit in Depressed Position

Clutch Pedal Assembly Drawing

Clutch Pedal Assembly Drawing

Top Base Plate Drawing

Top Base Plate Drawing

Bottom Base Plate Drawing

Bottom Base Plate Drawing

Base Bracket Drawing

Base Bracket Drawing

Beam ABC Drawing

Beam ABC Drawing

Beam BD Drawing

Beam BD Drawing

Beam CEF Drawing

Beam CEF Drawing

Step Down Plate Drawing

Step Down Plate Drawing

Step Down Plate Extension Drawing

Step Down Plate Extension Drawing

Wooden Block to Mount Limit Switch

Wooden Block to Mount Limit Switch

Final Clutch Subsystem Simulations

Preliminary analyses for stress, strain, and displacement were conducted in Solidworks for the Clutch Pedal Subsystem. However, due to the difficulty in running a simulation for the entire model, the loads applied needed to be scaled drastically down. This was largely a result of large displacements in the Solidworks simulation that confused the program and caused it to fail. However, by scaling the force, we were able to determine which component of the clutch pedal subsystem was most likely to fail. As seen, the Step Down Plate experienced the most stresses and strains. Following this conclusion, analyses for stress, strain, fatigue, and displacement were conducted for the individual Step Down Plate component. These simulations were run with much more accurate applied forces. The forces applied were validated through testing the O-SHIFT device with human foot force. Ultimately, the forces applied to the Step Down Plate did not cause it to fail, nor did it fatigue when run at 100,000 cycles.

Displacement Simulation Assembly

Displacement Simulation Assembly

Strain Simulation Assembly

Strain Simulation Assembly

Von Mises Stress Simulation Assembly

Von Mises Stress Simulation Assembly

Displacement Simulation Step Down Plate

Displacement Simulation Step Down Plate

Strain Simulation Step Down Plate

Strain Simulation Step Down Plate

Von Mises Stress Simulation Step Down Plate

Von Mises Stress Simulation Step Down Plate

Fatigue Simulation Step Down Plate

Fatigue Simulation Step Down Plate

Buckling Simulation Step Down Plate

Buckling Simulation Step Down Plate

Here is what the final clutch pedal mechanism, installed into the 2010 Ford Fusion, looks like:

Clutch Pedal Unit Installed in 2010 Ford Fusion

Clutch Pedal Unit Installed in 2010 Ford Fusion

Final Shifter Subsystem Models/Drawings

The shifter housing was created much to the same specifications as intended in the detailed design stage of MSD I. It featured wooden walls with an aluminum top plate. A leather finish was applied overtop the final design for aesthetic appeal (not seen in the models below). The lock-out plates from the original design were removed in the final prototype, as the return forces of the rubber bands exceeded the pulling force of the solenoids. The solenoids would need to be more powerful to overcome these return forces.

Shifter Housing

Shifter Housing

Exploded Shifter Housing

Exploded Shifter Housing

The shifter subsystem was wrapped in faux leather fabric, and a shifter boot was added, for a final product as seen below.

The Final Result for the Shifter Subsystem

The Final Result for the Shifter Subsystem

Final Display Subsystem Models/Drawings

The Display Case was modeled in SolidWorks and 3D-printed with the assistance of the RIT Construct. Originally, the front component of the Display Case was designed with attachment pegs and the rear component was designed with attachment holes. However, the layer-by-layer printing process caused the pegs and holes to have very rough, uneven edges. The variance in size of the peg and hole diameters added considerable friction and would not allow the attachment to mate as intended. So, in the final design of the Display Case, the attachment pegs were discarded and tape was used to adhere the front and back components together. Other pegs on the rear component of the Display Case were still printed to help mount any boards if necessary.

Display Case Assembly

Display Case Assembly

Display Case Front Drawing

Display Case Front Drawing

Display Case Rear Drawing

Display Case Rear Drawing

Here is what the display case looks like:

Display Screen Installed in 2010 Ford Fusion

Display Screen Installed in 2010 Ford Fusion

Internal Display Electronics

Internal Display Electronics

Final MonoBoard Schematics

P19231 Hardware

Power Supplies

Power Supplies

Common MCU

Common MCU

Display Board

Display Board

Shifter Board

Shifter Board

Board Layout

Board Layout

Final Software Applications

P19231 Software

Main Application Gear Selection

Main Application Gear Selection

Shifter Subsystem State Machine

Shifter Subsystem State Machine

Final Project Documents

Final Bill of Materials

P19231 Final BOM

Final BOM Summary

Final BOM Summary

Final BOM Clutch

Final BOM Clutch

Final BOM Shifter

Final BOM Shifter

Final BOM Display

Final BOM Display

Final BOM Monoboard 1

Final BOM Monoboard 1

Final BOM Monoboard 2

Final BOM Monoboard 2

Final BOM Misc.

Final BOM Misc.

Performance vs Requirements

P19231 Performance vs Requierements

Performance Vs Reqruirements

Performance Vs Reqruirements

Recommendations for future work

Conclusions

The O-SHIFT device meets most of the customer requirements and corresponding engineering requirements. The design fits in the 2010 Ford Fusion, adheres to safety standards and regulations, and does not affect the integrity of the automatic practice vehicle. It provides a means for users to learn the motions of driving a manual vehicle without the risk of damaging the vehicle’s clutch system. It achieves all of this for a price cheaper than racing simulators, though not as low as originally desired.

In preliminary test operations, the clutch subsystem pedal returns to its starting position somewhat slower than a real manual vehicle’s. This is due to the return speed of the pneumatic piston and actually might benefit users by teaching them to let up on the clutch pedal more slowly. User performance tests will validate or refute this claim.

The O-SHIFT device is still pending user testing. These tests will determine if the O-SHIFT is a viable means to learning to drive a standard transmission vehicle. To complete this process, participants who do not have manual driving experience will use the O-SHIFT for a period of time and their performance will be evaluated against other drivers who will only learn using a manual practice vehicle.


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