P19231: Training Wheels
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Integrated System Build & Test

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Integrated System Build & Test Phase

Team Plans for this Phase:

Team Accomplishments for this Phase:

Test Results Summary

In this phase, the prototype units were all developed and assembled individually. For the mechanical units, the RIT Machine Shop was utilized to machine and drill the various components based on the detailed drawings. Throughout the process, unforeseen challenges forced our team to evaluate the state of the project and determine the best course of action. In some instances, this entailed dropping low-priority customer/engineering requirements. In other instances, entire redesign efforts were implemented to rectify the problems.

For the clutch pedal unit, the uneven floor space where the initial pedal was intended to attach posed a challenging engineering problem. Finding a new location to mount the base of the pedal called for the entire pedal design to be reconsidered. The shape and size were adjusted to meet the new spacial requirements. The stroke length was verified to still be satisfactory. The force to depress the pedal was user-tested to ensure it retained realistic pressure. But, in relocating the base of the clutch unit and redesigning the unit, a new requirement was established. It was determined that the starting height and alignment of the clutch pedal was highly important to the comfort of the driver. So, a step-down unit was attached to the side of the clutch pedal structure to align the starting height of the clutch pedal with the starting height of the brake pedal. In doing this, it was important to ensure the structural stability of the clutch pedal frame could support the additional torque.

From there, integration between mechanical and electrical components began. The addition of a limit switch was incorporated to represent the engagement point of the clutch pedal. This can be seen in the following images, where the limit switch has been mounted to a wooden block beside the clutch pedal unit. When the arms of the clutch pedal rotate far enough, they engage the limit switch so that the O-SHIFT can transition gears.

Prototype Clutch Pedal Left Side View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Left Side View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Right Side View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Right Side View

The following images show the clutch pedal unit integrated into the 2010 Ford Fusion. Please note how the contours of the WeatherTech mat match the shaping of the Fusion's floor, adding stability and rigidity to the design. The large surface area of the floor mat increase static friction so the O-SHIFT base does not slide during use. Also note that at the time of these images, the limit switch had not yet been installed. However, the addition of the limit switch will not affect the installation or performance of the mechanical clutch pedal design. Large, flat sheet metal components fit around the WeatherTech mat and clamp to it. The sheet metal adds firmness to the floor unit and battles against any torques or torsion the Clutch Pedal Unit might experience when being compressed.

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle Side View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle Side View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle Driver View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle Driver View

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle with Driver

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle with Driver

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle with Foot Placement

Prototype Clutch Pedal Installed in Vehicle with Foot Placement

The MonoBoard was also populated during this phase.

The MonoBoard PCBs arrived during this phase and were populated and tested. There were a few issues encountered both with the PCBs and the placement process. There were issues placing the voltage regulating chips due to their small size. In addition, the pin numbers were flipped for the SD card due to an error in the data sheet so SD card functionality was dropped. There was also an issue where the output pins coming from the solenoid drivers were wired incorrectly. This was fixed by using a wire to jump traces on the PCB. At this point, both the Display and Shifter board are fully populated and tested.

Prototype Monoboard

Prototype Monoboard

The Shifter Housing Unit was also built and assembled. Wood was chosen for the design for ease of use and manufacturing. As this unit was not experiencing tremendous forces, it would not need the same material requirements that the Clutch Pedal Unit needed. Once the unit was built and installed, a leather covering would be installed to add aesthetic appeal to the final design.

In manufacturing the lock out plates, another problem was discovered. The lock out plate shape had been designed to the exact same specifications as the top plate of the Shifter Housing Unit. In practice, the lock out plates were supposed to reside a couple inches below the top plate. As the shifter knob was rotating from a fixed location, what this meant was that the spacing between the lockout plate gaps and the top plate gaps should not have been identical. To combat this, the lock out plates were installed as closely to the top plate as possible. A couple additional components were built and installed to correct this sizing issue.

After the lockout plates were installed, tracks were built and installed into the housing where the plates will slide across them.

From there, limit switches were added to the Shifter Housing Unit. Again, these switches would bridge the gap between the mechanical and electrical sides of the project. Engaging these limit switches would notify the central MCU of the location of the shifter and the corresponding gear the user was in. Images of the Shifter Housing Unit are displayed below. The top image shows the internal structure of the Shifter Housing Units with the lock plates installed. The bottom image shows the mounting of the limit switches.

Prototype Shifter Housing Internal View

Prototype Shifter Housing Internal View

Prototype Shifter Housing Plate

Prototype Shifter Housing Plate

Test Results

First, we needed some baseline force results to see how much force a human could reasonably exert on a vehicle. To measure this, we conducted some tests at the gym to evaluate maximum foot force, as well as maximum push and pull force. If the mechanical units could withstand these maximum force tests, then it would withstand reasonable driving conditions.

Test Result

Test Result

For the data collection part, we can see below a look-up-table mapping a speed in MPH to its corresponding RPM in that gear. This table follows the increase iteration of 0.62 MPH. The table assumes constant acceleration, and hence the stall when the RPM's have reached a value close to the average idle RPM: 915.35 rpm. There are currently 2 color values, black indicated values that have been calculated from the average of the data collected, while the red is a calculated approximation following the pattern found per gear but with not data to validate or test against. There are some blank spaces on the table, and this are values that will not be able to be tested or have no value (They went over the RPM red line).

Data Table 1

Data Table 1

Data Table 2

Data Table 2

Below, we can see 4 graphs that represent the difference between the average collected data to the calculated RPMs values. There was also some %Error calculations at the bottom, which was the average of compared values from the collected data to the calculated. For the 5th gear, we are gonna need more data to get a better representation and more meaningful data.

Data Table 1

Data Table 1

Risk and Problem Tracking

For this section of the design, there were no updates to the risk assessment as no major changes to any designs were made or any major changes that would affect the overall project were made.

Risk Assessment 1

Risk Assessment 1

Risk Assessment 2

Risk Assessment 2

Risk Assessment 3

Risk Assessment 3

Below a link to the live document of Risk Assessment:

P19231 Risk Assessment

On the problem tracking, we have documented 4 problems so far. These 2 problems added were critical as it can be seen on the CMO Chart. Problem 4 so far is the only one we have fully test the functionality of the fix we implemented.

Problem Tracking List

Problem Tracking List

Problem Tracking CMO Chart

Problem Tracking CMO Chart

Below a link to the live document of Problem Tracking:

P19231 Problem Tracking

Plans for next phase

TEAM PLAN

For the next phase of the project, we plan to thoroughly test the integration of the subassemblies and how they interact. We plan to make sure all communications work as intended and debug any coding problems. From there, we plan to test the unit in the 2010 Ford Fusion (automatic vehicle) and compare results to the 2012 Chevy Cruze. We will ensure all tests from our Test Plans document have been completed and that results make reasonable sense. And, after that point, we will begin the final presentation documents and posters to summarize our results.

Schedule

Schedule

INDIVIDUAL PLANS

Steve Keil

Tyler Smith

Kevin Gates

Kevin Ramirez

Matt Wagner

John Jenco


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