P19280: Hot Wheelz
/public/

Problem Definition

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Problem Definition Phase

Plan

Actual

Project Summary

The RIT Hot Wheelz team is in need of a custom motor controller for future iterations of the car. The desired outcome of this project is to produce a fully physically assembled motor controller for testing demonstrations which includes a cooling system, an enclosure, the circuitry, processor, and safety systems. The current state of controllers on the market are “black box” configurations meaning that the programming and circuitry is unknown making changeability or modifications almost impossible. Currently the team repurchases motor controllers each year because of critical design changes that impact compatibility.

Use Cases

Basic Operation

This use case describes the basic, expected operation of the controller when the car is turned on and off.

This use case describes the basic, expected operation of the controller when the car is turned on and off.

The basic operations use case describes the interaction between the driver, controller, and motor when the car is turned on and off. In this case, the controller blocks energy flow to the motor, and the car remains at rest. This use case is demonstrated whenever the car is turned on. It is important that the controller correctly blocks energy during the idle phase to prevent the car from moving, as unexpected movement of the car may cause a safety concern to the driver, team members, bystanders, or items in the vicinity of the car. This is especially important during testing, and when demonstrating the car.

Acceleration

This use case describes the basic, expected operation of the controller when the car accelerates.

This use case describes the basic, expected operation of the controller when the car accelerates.

The acceleration use case describes the interaction between the driver, controller, and motor when the car accelerates. In this case, when the driver presses the accelerator pedal, the controller determines the correct amount of energy to pass to the motor, and then allows the energy to pass. This use case demonstrates the action of the controller when the car is driving and racing.This case is important because it is the main function of the controller: to control the motor during races.

Cooling System

This use case describes the interaction between the motor controller, temperature sensor, and cooling system.

This use case describes the interaction between the motor controller, temperature sensor, and cooling system.

The cooling system use case describes the interaction between the driver, controller, the internal temperature sensor, the internal processor, and the internal cooling system. In this case, when the car turns on, the temperature sensor begins to continuously feed the current temperature to the processor. Based on the current temperature, the processor activates and deactivates the cooling system as necessary. This use case is demonstrated when the controller overheats. It is important because if the cooling system does not activate at the appropriate time, the electronics inside the controller may be damaged and the car may shut down.

Faults

This use case describes the processes when a fault occurs.

This use case describes the processes when a fault occurs.

The faults use case describes the interaction between the driver the controller, team members, and bystanders when a fault occurs in the controller. In this case when a fault occurs in the controller and the car is running, the controller will send a signal and then shut down. The driver will stop the car and exit, a team member will come to assist, and any bystanders will be evacuated. It is important because if the controller does not shut down when a fault occurs it could be damaged. Additionally if the driver, team members, and bystanders are not aware that a fault occurred it could result in injury.

Project Goals and Key Deliverables

The main goals are to set up a controller that will:

  1. Have many I/O pins to incorporate sensors
  2. Set up a powerful microcontroller/processor for a potentially more complex controls system in the future
  3. Have adequate internal sensors to more easily debug the system
  4. The ability to be programed with an easy to use GUI
  5. Be designed so it is small, compact, and lightweight
  6. Have a case that is easy to manufacture
  7. Incorporate an effective cooling system

Customer Requirements (Needs)

Customer Requirements

Customer Requirements

A working document can be found here.

Engineering Requirements (Metrics & Specifications)

Engineering Requirements

Engineering Requirements

A working document can be found here.

Constraints

House of Quality

House of Quality

House of Quality

The House of Quality is used to compare the customer requirements to the engineering requirements. When inputting the weight of each customer requirement and adding relationship strengths of the CR and the ER, the importance of each engineering requirement is shown. For this project, the most important engineering requirements are current and voltage range. The least important for this project is staying in budget. This spreadsheet allows us to see clearly which engineering requirements we should be putting more resources into.

A working document can be found here.

Design Review Materials

Pre-Read

Presentation

Plans for next phase

In the next 3 weeks our team will do the following:

Individual Three Week Plans

Jenny Genovese

Jordan Mack

Katie Ward

MacKenzie Woodhouse

Rachel Mock

Sam Poeppelman


Home | Planning & Execution | Imagine RIT

Problem Definition | Systems Design | Preliminary Detailed Design | Detailed Design

Build & Test Prep | Subsystem Build & Test | Integrated System Build & Test | Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation