P19432: Murphy's Stage
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Subsystem Build & Test

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Subsystem Level Build & Test Phase

What did we plan to do?
  1. Have all parts ordered and delivered
  2. Have fully assembled sandwich and frame (middle stage only)
  3. Point load testing on sandwich assembly
  4. Minor design optimizations
  5. Update risk management and problem tracking

What did we actually do?

  1. Partially Complete. Most parts ordered and delivered, Waiting on confirmation of pricing for Home Depot
  2. Incomplete. Hardboard, Plywood, and Adhesive are missing not yet ordered for Sandwich Panels. Stage Frame Members are cut to size, but still have to be milled, drilled, and welded.
  3. Partially Complete. Point load testing on sandwich assembly was conducted, and affirmed some earlier results, but is not as conclusive as desired without adhesive between materials. Testing will be redone when adhesive is acquired from Home Depot.
  4. Complete. Locking Mechanism was redesigned for ease of use and reliability. Finishing of Exposed sandwich panel faces was considered more thoughtfully. More effective solution for interface panels was established.
  5. Complete. Continually updated risk management and problem tracking

Design Optimizations & Additions

Locking Mechanism The previous locking mechanism was fairly primitive in design, a block which acted as a hard stop that could be slid into place. With the intention of designing a simpler locking mechanism which was better integrated into the stage, we implemented a sliding pin protruding from the frame which will slide into the wooden posts which tie into the ground. The pin is intended to be disengaged before transformation and reengaged after transformation. There will be one pin for each section of stage.
 View of Sliding Pin Locking Mechanism

View of Sliding Pin Locking Mechanism

 Circled Locations of Locking Mechanisms - One per Stage Section

Circled Locations of Locking Mechanisms - One per Stage Section

Interface Panels There is a 0.5" nominal gap between sections of stage to prevent interference. The previous solution to spanning this gap was to place down removable, carpeted pieces of 1/4" plywood. However, this imposes a tripping hazard since the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 defines a trip hazard as any vertical change of over 1/4". A trip hazard on a performance stage is unacceptable. We consulted with Chris Beckley from Interior Design since we wanted the solution to not only be functional and safe, but also visually appealing. The solution he recommended was a thin metal T-bar which can be dropped into place between the sections of stage. The wall thickness is 0.05" which does not pose a trip hazard.

 Front View of Stage Showing Nominal Gap Between Sections

Front View of Stage Showing Nominal Gap Between Sections

 0.05

0.05" Wall Thickness T-bar

Stair Edging In an attempt to make the edges of the stage look nice, a stair edging will be used on the stage. This will conceal the end of the carpet and sandwich edge. At current, we are not set on a specific design or material.

 Example of Stair Edging

Example of Stair Edging

Test Results Summary

Point Load Testing will be conducted on March 1st, 2019. Live test plans are located here: here.

Material Processing

 Eric Sorting Through Material

Eric Sorting Through Material

 Vinny Sorting Through Material

Vinny Sorting Through Material

 Testing Sandwich Sample

Testing Sandwich Sample

 Kevin Cutting Aluminum Joists

Kevin Cutting Aluminum Joists

 Our Pile of Cut Aluminum Tubing

Our Pile of Cut Aluminum Tubing

Risk and Problem Tracking

View live problem tracking here.

View live risk management here.

Plans for next phase

Jason Schulz

Vincent D'Arrigo

Eric Szyjka


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