P20510: Eastman Museum Digitization Improvement
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Customer Handoff & Final Project Documentation

Table of Contents

Team Vision for Final Demo and Handoff

The team planned on finishing construction of the rotating table subsystem and the mechanical arm subsystem so that they could test these systems individually to work out any issues and then work on integrating these systems.

Due to the Covid-19 outbreak and the subsequent cancellation of in-person classes at RIT this was put on hold. The team instead focused on updating prior design documentation and creating more documentation with the aim of passing this off to a follow-on MSD team to complete the design.


Table

Mechanical Work

Roughly what currently exists.

Roughly what currently exists.

Roughly what currently exists. There is also a bunch of lumber, a motor, and other electrical stuff not included in this pic.


Step 1

Step 1

The cross pieces may need to finish being notched. Was doing this before spring break and the coronavirus dilema, and am not sure exactly where it was left off.


Step 2

Step 2

The first crossing support should be placed along the internal seam of the plywood, and both pieces of plywood should be screwed to it.


Step 3

Step 3

Next the rotation table needs centered on the table bearing. We were doing this by placing the table on the bearing and holding a scale/ruler (tape measure) on the square table under the rotating table. Then we slowly spun the rotating table and adjusted the table until all 360 degrees gave the same measure. Then there are holes in the bottom of the plywood to screw through in order to reach the table bearing screw hole locations (rotate/find screw holes, put 2 screws in, rotate to next screw location, etc.). We used the medium and large (I think) screw holes to put a total of 8 screws into the table.

Note: The rotating table will need to be removed to put the final support in, so don’t bother with all 8 screws until after the support is in place.


Step 4

Step 4

The next step involves multiple things all coming together. The motor and shaft should be concentric with the table and bearing, this will determine the location of the support. The coupling may dictate the height of the motor on the support (may just be easier to remove some extra material from the ‘flat’ cross support to give clearance for the motor/coupling to be higher). This height dictates the length the shaft needs to be cut to (though it has a lot of wiggle room on bothe the coupling side and the table flange side). We planned to line up then attach the motor to the support first. Then to line up the shaft and put the support in place.

Note: This should be attached from the sides and top (want an inch (or more) in the 2x4 so use 3in screws from top). This means the rotating table will need to be taken back off though it should be easier to center with the shaft at the center (can put all 8 screws in the bearing this time).


Step 5

Step 5

Build and attach legs. We had found ‘feet’ to use, but they may be beyond repair and you may need to find/order some.


Step 6

Step 6

Build support/stand for mechanical arm. Current idea is basically a 2x4 cut to width or with a slot to width. Attach mechanical arm subsystem.


Step 7

Step 7

Cut and attach the table connector pieces. May be easier to attach if you put plywood behind the connector pieces.


Step 8

Step 8

Build and attach the plywood safeguard. Note: To be effective, the plywood safeguard would need to be half inch plywood (or double layered of the quarter inch, but we don’t believe there is enough) which would need to be purchased.

This was an extra goal and could be done at the end or not at all.


Step 9

Step 9

Attach the electrical box


Step 10

Step 10

Build and attach the control panel.


Step 11

Step 11

Finishing touches. Sanding, paint/finish?, etc. Also, quick tests to make sure everything is good.


Step 12

Step 12

Deliver the table to the museum, and attach the tables. All final testing.


Step 13

Step 13

Electrical Work

Holes in electrical enclosure need to be adjusted for a better fit for the power supply and the polycarbonate rectangle that the protoboard and table motor controller will be sitting on

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0

Protoboard and table motor controller will need to be mounted to polycarbonate rectangle

Once everything is mounted in the electrical enclosure, wiring will need to be run from the enclosure to table motor, mechanical arm, and push buttons and the power supply cable will need to be run to an outlet

Once wiring is laid out, and finalized, use the zip-tie mounting pads to make the wire paths neat and secured to bottom of table

Final location of buttons is still up in the air, follow on team can pick final location at their discretion

It is suggested that follow on team looks into a way to mitigate risk of electrical enclosure becoming electrified if power supply cable breaks

The Schematic Drawing is not accurate. Had to redesign midway for better wiring clearance, and could not get access to modified PCB so drawing is an attempt to see changes

Arm

Mechanical Work

Need to complete color bar holder

Attach color bar to color bar holder. Does not need to have a very strong mode of adhesive to the holder, but the color bar will need to remain in a consistent position as the arm moves from position to position. One idea for implementing this is slotting an indent in the holder that is the dimensions of the color bar, which can remain inside and resist any motion on it. Another is using an adhesive substance, provided by Elizabeth, to attach the color bar to the holder in a non-permanent way.

Electical Work

The electrical work is functional, and just needs some tuning. The number of steps required to go forward is lower than the number of steps required to move backwards the same distance, so that will need to be accounted for. Also, we have the Teensy break a few times. We’re still not entirely sure what caused this, but be very careful to make sure everything is grounded properly before connecting it to the power supply and the computer.

Software

Autocrop

Code still requires additional testing to verify continued reliability in addition to the improved performance time. Attention should be directed at the cropping of the color bar out of the image, leaving just the artifact. Currently, the raycast is only being performed at the center of each side perpendicular to the corresponding side in order to locate the artifact edges. After this initial crop, additional raycasts can be performed starting in each corner in order to find the gap between the color bar and the artifact. This can be used to crop the color bar from the artifact.

Also, code still needs to be integrated with the Applescript for multithreaded performance.

Teensey

Placeholder values are currently in place for both the stepper motor driving the mechanical arm and the DC servo motor driving the rotating table. These values should be adjusted accordingly in integration testing. Also, the buffer for the buttons should be tested to verify the OnButtonDown, OnButtonUp, etc code works as desired.

Test Results Summary

Design Vs Requirements

A link to the live document can be found here.

Design vs Requirements

Design vs Requirements

Key

Key

Risk and Problem Tracking

Final Project Documentation

Functional Demo Materials

Plans for Wrap-up

Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, we were unable to complete our project as desired. We left detailed documentation on how we were planning to finish our project and how a future group can potentially take over.

Our plan for the next group can be found here

Final Documents

A directory consisting a snapshot of all of our live documents as of this phase can be found here (files) and here (photo gallery).

Additional Files

As a reminder, ALL of our team's files and documents are available on the Edge directory, which can be accessed here.

Not all files can be displayed on an Edge webpage, especially for 3D models, simulations, code files, Movie Maker files, absurdly large image files (~gig in size) and other binary files, but this shared directory contains ALL of our team's files.

Because of repeated confusion of whether our work is posted on Edge, please check the actual Edge directory. (Trying to navigate the file directory should be no more complicated than navigating the MSD MyCourses documents.)

It is our objective to preserve ALL of our work for future teams to see. Some work may be placed in the /private directory, however, but we did try to move everything needed to /public.

A backup of our Google Drive is also available here.


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